A Must-Try Lunge Variation! (w/video)

Lunges have been a training staple forever. Front lunges, back lunges, lateral lunges, reaching lunges, transverse lunges and many, many more….all of which have their purpose and, when done correctly, can be incredibly beneficial to overall leg strength and endurance.

Here’s a variation you may not have tried, but is very challenging. It’s essentially a combination of a forward reaching lunge and walking lunge. The key is to take a large step and lean the body forward as you bend the forward leg. Touch the fingertips to the floor, then press off the lead leg and transfer immediately to the same lunge with the opposite leg. As you lunge, keep the back leg mostly straight, with a slight bend at the knee. All of this results in a greater range of motion as compared to a regular walking lunge. You’ll understand when you try a couple sets.

A couple points to consider are:

  • Keep looking forward as you lunge, limiting the “hunching” or rounding of the upper back
  • Keep the motion constant – try not to pause between steps
  • Make sure the power from each step comes only from the lead leg

For added intensity, hold a medicine ball or dumbbells in your hands and “reach” with them as you normally would with just the hands. A weight vest is also great for upping the intensity.

Start with about 30 steps and see how it feels. If you’re confined to a limited space, walk the perimeter or do laps, making sure not to pause when you switch directions. After the the first round of 30, pause for about 20 seconds and begin a second round. If you’re just too damn strong, add some extra resistance and try again. Trust me, there’s a big difference between these lunges and your average walking lunge.

If you don’t notice a difference, watch the video again and make sure you’re doing the same motion. Instead of using that mirror to pose in front of, use it to check your form. 🙂

Good luck and train hard!

Jason K.
www.hybridfitness.tv

Use the Smith Machine…Yeah I said it!

In the video below you will see some ideas of how you can use a Smtih Machine to teach people a variety of body-weight pushing and pulling movements. If you have never tried any of these your self you may find some of them to be more challenging then you might think. If you are a trainer and always thought the Smith Machine was a waste of space then perhaps you will see that it can in fact be a useful tool at times. As with most fitness tools you may find that the Smith Machine may be used for a broad array of fun and challenging exercise options. Just remember to keep an open mind, have fun and use your imagination.

PAU for NOW

TAKU
www.hybridfitness.tv