Kitchen Sink Shake

I love protein shakes. I have been consuming them in one form or another for years. The secret to a good protein shake is like any other recipe. Get high quality ingredients, and then tweak the combination until you find the taste, texture and flavor that suits you best. I eat about two shakes per day. For breakfast I usually have the “Kitchen Sink” shake. It is great tasting, and nutrient dense. Later in the day I often have my Old-School Super Shake Version 2.0

Kitchen-Sink Shake Recipe

1 cup of water, Yerba-Mate or iced green tea (I use Yerba-Mate)

1-2 scoops vanilla milk protein blend (I, use a blend of Casein, Egg and Whey)

0.5-1 cup of frozen berry blend (I use Blueberries)

1-2 tablespoons of ground flax seeds (I use organic seeds, and grind my own)

2-3 tablespoons of mixed nuts (I use Organic Almonds and Walnuts)

1 teaspoon creatine (Nothing fancy, just good old mono-hydrate)

1 cup  Baby Spinach (I use Organic)

Add all ingredients in blender and blend on high for 30-40 seconds.

I drink one of these shakes (usually for breakfast), along with 1-3 capsules of fish oil, and my multi-vitamin. To be sure you’re picking up the right kind of protein supplement, when shopping around, pick up the protein container, flip it over, and search for “milk protein isolate” or “milk protein blend.” If you see either of these on the ingredients list (or simply, whey and casein as two of the top ingredients), you’re in business. I am currently using a custom protein blend from the “Protein Factory“, which has a blend of egg, casein, and whey.

Shakes are a great way to get high quality nutrition in a quick efficient manner. So try out the “Kitchen Sink” and see if you don’t walk away feeling great!

PAU for NOW

TAKU

Passing of a Legend

I just found out that Jack Lalanne has left us. I am saddened by the news, but recognize that he lived a very long and amazing life, full of adventures and incredible feats of strength and fitness. I am sure that the web is buzzing with this news, but felt I should at least pause for a moment and honor this man who was a  true pioneer in the pursuit of health and fitness.

https://i1.wp.com/www.knowledgerush.com/wiki_image/2/2b/Jack_LaLanne_publicity_shot_1940s.jpgjack-lala-red.jpg

Visit these links to find out some of Jacks amazing accomplishments:

JACKS HOME PAGE

FEATS & HONORS

WIKI-JACK

Take a moment of Silence….

PAU for NOW

TAKU

“Building up or Wearing out?”

By Jim Bryan

This is a question I find myself thinking about often. My friends and colleagues talk about this in ongoing conversations. All of us have at least 20 years invested in exercise, not just weight training. For me, I’m going on 50 years of pretty much continuous training for strength, conditioning, or physical skill improvement. I do believe the statement that you have only so many beats in your heart. BUT I feel exercise (at least in early to advanced stages) adds some beats. Studies prove that exercise does help you live longer and adds more “life improvement.” But what about us hard heads that have approached exercise with the “Take no prisoners attitude?”

In the long run this could be bad. Anything in exercise taken to the extreme could wind up being harmful sooner or later. In my case I feel it has become later and I am very aware of how I do things now. I no longer try to squeeze every darn drop of sweat out of me during training. I’m not saying I’m ready for the rocking chair (but you can find me there sometimes. J) What I’m saying is this, When you have been training for several years, you should be smart enough to look at what you have learned and ask the question “Does it still work for me?” If you can HONESTLY answer yes, then good on ya! If you have to justify or BS yourself, then you are headed for a breakdown.

I know the big question will be, “Are you still training HIT?”

I train the way I have learned from many that took the time to teach me. Arthur Jones was one and he had a great impact on my training but I don’t think of myself as this “Great HIT Guru” like some of the Internet HIT types. Others have shown me much that I am able to use. Bill Lemacks, Al Christensen, Tom Bowman, Craig Whitehead, Harry Smith all had massive input early into my Strength Training and Bodybuilding. I was curious and sought out people with more experience than me.

Today at 65, I look at this situation differently. I don’t like being hurt or sore all the time. I don’t always train to failure. I use many different methods to train. I try to keep in mind “Is this helpful or will I pay with pain?” I do have chronic problems brought on by, the best way I can describe it is, “stupidity.” Long answer made short is this. You can train hard when you are young but keep it safe. You can speed the “wearing out” process if you don’t use good sense.

You will pay daily later on if you don’t. Don’t neglect one over the other (strength———Conditioning) Spend time in the Gym, but don’t forget to get outside and “Move” regularly too!

Keep in mind that training is supposed to make you better, not cripple you.

Simple 20 Minute Conditioning

This week features another brief, intense and challenging workout which Combines running with body weight exercises.

For this workout you will only need your body-weight as the resistance. If you choose to train outdoors, I recommend that you go to a park or a high-school athletic field, and use running as the active segment between specific exercises. If you train indoors you may choose any of the suggested machines or any other activity that seems to fit the bill.

Attempt to complete the entire workout with minimal rest between each exercise or run. The goal time for completion is 20 minutes.
2:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Push-ups x max reps
1:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Bicycle Crunches x max reps
2:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Body Weight Squats x max reps
1:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Push-ups x max reps
2:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Bicycle Crunches x max reps
1:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Body Weight Squats x max reps
2:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
This workout was created by my friend Coach Tom Kelso.
PAU for NOW
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www.blackjackfitness.com

Strength Training and Fighters

By Jim Bryan

First some background on myself. Everyone that pursues an athletic career has particular sports that appeal to them. Mine were ones that involved strength and contact. As a youngster I loved Football, never heard of Rugby but I would have liked that too. I also loved to wrestle, never had any training (no programs existed)  I trained and competed in Olympic Lifting, Power Lifting, and Body Building. I also served as a judge and coach. In fighting I trained in Boxing, Kick Boxing, Muay Thai, Wing Chun, Karate, Kali, and JKD. I’ve also worked as a Coach, Corner man, Judge, and Ref. I also  worked as a Strength Coach for a couple of years and worked in several Health Clubs. By now most people also know that I was heavily influenced by Arthur Jones. He helped me get the job as Strength Coach. I was also learning to be a Highlands Game Judge but gave that up for lack of time.

So what? Well, this is not meant to make me appear to be a “Macho Man”. I’m not. My Wife says “I’m just a hard-headed Irish man” I am Irish American and proud of it! I cry easy and fight easy. This is just to let the reader know I have some experience…about 40 years of it. Experience is one of the qualities most lacking  among the Internet Soothsayers.

When I refer to fighters I’m primarily talking about athletic contests not bar room brawlers. A fighter’s life is taken up with skill training and conditioning. Not much time left over, much the same as with other sports. Fighters are some of the best-conditioned athletes out there. I happen to believe that Strength Training should be a part of that training. Two fighters of the same skill and condition…the stronger will usually win. Royce Gracie might appear to contradict that. He beat much larger fighters in NHB. BUT the other fighters were competing in a sport that they didn’t know much about! It took a while but they figured it out and Royce is smart to stay away now!

How do you go about adding Strength Training? What method of the popular ones should you use?

Olympic Lifting

Can you get strong by Olympic Lifting? Why hell yes you can! Olympic Lifting is a highly developed skill, so you better be sure you get the proper coaching. If you already have the skill you can get very strong by doing it. Olympic Lifting does have a higher possibility of injury, even if you are skilled. It may not be the most time efficient way for a fighter to get his/her Strength Training. If you enjoy the movements and are aware of the danger, then use them.

Power Lifting

Power Lifting builds some s-t-r-o-n-g individuals. It also carries some danger.  Remember you are a fighter, so keep your priorities in order. Instead of going for singles use higher reps. Power Lifters usually use a time efficient method of training. Get the proper coaching, and learn the movements. Squats and Deadlifts are good exercises if you can safely do them.

Dino Training

When I was doing this type training it wasn’t called “Dino”… It was just called training. Times have changed, it is now a category by itself. Lifting odd objects can build great strength. You have got to be careful though. You can’t fight if you are hurt.  If you can figure a way out to include some “Dino” you may find more enjoyment to be had from your daily training grind.

Super Slow

Just because some one says that they know or can teach you Super Slow doesn’t make it so! Many out there claiming to be Super Slow Trainers are FOS. Check for a Certification!! It should be signed by Ken Hutchins. Make no mistake about it, Super Slow can make you strong,  it is time efficient, and safe. The main thing is…can you put up with the strict approach?

High Intensity Training (H.I.T.)

High Intensity Training is mainly a philosophy of training or a set of guidelines that are not written in stone. They evolve.  The best thing going for the fighter is H.I.T. is time efficient. I’m not going to address whether or not you should train to failure, make that decision on your own. Stick with mainly multi joint movements and some single joint.

Hard Gainer

To me this is like H.I.T. I like it. I like the Philosophy and the basic approach. I also like the emphasis on safety. Actually, for me this is more like “Old Style H.I.T.”

Hybrid

Combine some of the methods. Include what appeals to you. High Intensity Training can be combined easily. If you look at Arthur’s early info it would pass for more of a Hybrid as compared to what many people think  H.I.T. now is. I come from “Old Style H.I.T.” and am more accepting of other methods. Just don’t step on my toes or get in my face to get your point across. I’m happy to listen…I might learn something.

Combat Conditioning

If you’re a fighter you BETTER be doing it! Each fighting sport has it’s own accepted method of conditioning. It has to be done. I feel Strength Training should be added somehow. It would be nice if all the training  came from coaches working together to help the fighter.

Strong Man

This for sure will help you. Strong Men pick up and run with weights that Olympic Lifters and Power lifters just try to get off the ground. They also train with awkward implements like the Dino’s. It can be very dangerous and needs a good Coach. Remember, when you are hurt you can’t fight…Or train! Done right this can be great.

Trainers

Personal Trainers may not be of much help to the fighter unless the Trainer has been a fighter. That way they understand what you go through. Many Personal Trainers are just not qualified even if they are certified. Most are going to try to treat you like a Body Builder. Try to find a Strength Coach.

Free weights or machines?

What do you have at your disposal? Use what you have! Remember you are trying to build strength not demonstrate it.

Genetics

No getting around it Genetics have a bearing on your athletic ability. Don’t whine about poor genetics or use it as an excuse. You can always improve your strength to a level higher than what you started with. You’ll need discipline, determination, and consistency. You may find your genetics weren’t so bad after all. No excuses just solutions!

I feel that fighters are some of the hardest working athletes alive. Doesn’t matter… Boxers, MMA, Submission, Kick Boxers, Thai Boxers, Wrestlers. Do I think Pro Wrestlers are fighters? Some of them could do very well in MMA or Submission. Some couldn’t. I feel that they are athletes just the same but I don’t like it (Pro Wrestling) To me it has become a study in bad manners and attitude. The WWE “in your face” attitude pisses me off. It has produced many smart ass  “Wana bees”

The Best Method

Okay, what do I feel is the best way for a fighter to Strength Train? The best way is a method that is safe, doesn’t take much time and one that the fighter will actually do. It also needs to be progressive or it won’t work very long. The emphasis should be on building strength not on a pretty boy physique. Any of the methods will do it. Depending upon your goals and time, some methods may “fit” better. Whatever you choose it won’t hurt you to be STRONGER!

Res Non Verba.

Workout in a hurry

6 weeks to a new you in the New Year (Part two)

In part one of this article I told you that we could re-shape your body in as little as 15 workouts over just six weeks. Having read part one you should have taken all of your photos and measurements as well as outlined your eating for the first few weeks of the plan. You should also know how many push-ups and sit-ups you can do as well as your time for a wall sit and how far you can run in 30 seconds. In part two I am going to outline the nuts and bolts of the plan as well as answer some basic questions and give options for those who may have limited access to workout equipment or who want to do their training bare-bones, boot-camp style; outside or at home.

We don’t have a lot of time. That is why we are using this plan in the first place. Let me reassure you it is not about the quantity but the quality of effort that is put forth that makes this type of training so efficient and effective. The workouts themselves are going to be brief and infrequent and therefore should be done with the utmost intensity. Don’t be intimidated by that word. Even if you are a beginner or coming back from a lay off you can work out hard enough to get great results. The secret is to try as hard as you can at the moment. As you recover and adapt each week, you will find that you are able to step it up a little more.

The workout will be done as follows. Each training day you will focus on a certain body region along with your cardio and stretching. None of these workouts should ever take longer then an hour including the warm-up, stretching and cool-down. In fact 45 – 50 minutes will probably be all you need as your fitness improves over the next few weeks. When I make recommendations for how many sets you should perform you will notice that I say one set. In my experience one good set is all you need to have success. Some people just can not seem to handle this approach and feel they need more. If you choose to do more keep this in mind. For each set you add you are using up more of your bodies recovery ability as well as increasing the total time you spend working out. The whole reason we are doing this workout is because we are in a hurry; so trust me and just do one set as hard as you can.

For the cardio portion of your training plan, your job is also to work as hard as you can in the moment. Whatever machine you choose to use I want you to go as far as possible in 15 minutes. I find that 15 minutes is all you need if you are really working as hard as you can. The cardio session is broken down as follows: You wont need to warm-up because you just finished your strength training session. So, pick a machine and work as hard and fast as you can for 12 minutes and then cool-down for about 3 minutes.

Do not increase the length of time you do cardio, just do your best to cover more distance then you did last time. How will you know how far you went? Look at the machine. Most of these machines will give you a distance read out. If not then use calories as your guide. If you burn more calories during the same length of time that means you are working harder then before.

Each time you train, be sure to write down everything you do in the gym. Write down how much you lifted in each exercise and when you can do more then 10 reps in any exercise, add some weight. Write down the distance you covered or the number of calories burned in your cardio session and strive to go further or burn more next time. Every little increase is significant. Be sure to keep the time you do your cardio consistent so that the calorie and distance numbers are accurate from session to session. Remember you are only working really hard for about 12 minutes.

The Workouts:

Workout 1. Lower body:

5 minute warm-up treadmill, bike, or rower

Squats 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell Lateral Lunges 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell Lunges to the rear 1 x 6-10 (each leg)

Straight leg dead-lifts 1 x 6-10

Single leg calf raise 1 x 6-10 (each leg)

Mid-section: Hanging knee raise or incline knee raise, low back extension, band or pulley rotations. 1 x 8-15

Cardio: Machine of your choice for max distance or calories in 12 minutes

Cool-Down: 3 minutes

Stretch: 5-10 minutes full body

Workout 2. Pushing (two days after workout 1.)

5 minute warm-up on treadmill, bike, or rower

Flat Dumbbell flyes or pec-deck 1 x 6-10

Incline barbell or machine press 1 x 6-10

Dips 1 x 6-10 (If you can do more then 10 add weight)

Dumbbell, cable, or machine lateral raise 1 x 6-10

Barbell, dumbbell, or machine shoulder press 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell, cable, or machine rear delt 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell, or cable, overhead triceps extensions 1 x 6-10

Cable or machine triceps push-downs 1 x 6-10

Cardio: Machine of your choice for max distance or calories in 12 minutes

Cool-Down: 3 minutes

Stretch: 5-10 minutes full body

Workout 3.  Pulling (two days after workout 2.)

5 minute warm-up on treadmill, bike, or rower

Pull-ups or assisted pull-ups 1 x 6-10 (if you can do more then 10 pull-ups, add weight)

Close grip (V-bar) pull-downs 1 x 6-10

Reverse back fly with cable, dumbbells, or machine 1 x 6-10

Bent over rows with a dumbbell or barbell 1 x 6-10

Standing shrugs with dumbbells, barbells, or machine 1 x 6-10

Mid-section: Hanging knee raise or incline knee raise, low back extension, band or pulley rotations. 1 x 8-15

Cardio: Machine of your choice for max distance or calories in 12 minutes

Cool-Down: 3 minutes

Stretch: 5-10 minutes full body

Rest two days before starting over with workout number one.

Tips for continued success:

Intensity:

The repetition guidelines I have listed are just that, guidelines. Do not stop a set until you are un-able to perform another perfect rep. With exercises like Squats or Stiff-legged dead-lifts, stop 1-2 reps short of failure.

How much rest:

After you warm-up, move quickly from exercise to exercise. Strive to rest no more then 60 seconds between exercises.

How to be progressive:

First increase reps then increase weight. Once you can exceed 10 reps on your main exercises or 15 on core movements, add 5-10 lbs of weight.

How to add variety:

Exercises are essentially exchangeable. Exchange any major multi-joint, pushing, pulling or lower body movement with any other. Single joint movements such as arm curls and extensions as well as mid-section movements may be changed frequently as well. Just be sure to write down what you do and train as hard as possible on each work set.

Cardio:

Pick whatever machines you like or have available. Bike, Treadmill, Stair-climber, Rowing machine, they are all effective. For best results mix things up and use a different machine or mode each time. Just be sure to write down your distance or calories accurately.

Home training:

If you are doing this workout at home and have a well stocked home gym then follow the plan as closely as possible. If you are using resistance bands, sandbags, dumbbells, kettlebells, and or bodyweight movements then again create workouts that are as similar to those in the above plan as possible. Our exercise library database has more then enough ideas for you to choose from. For the cardio portion go to a track and see how far you can run around the track in 12 minutes (not including warm-up and cool-down). Choose a set time as before (say 12 minutes) and start running. In week one it may take you 12 minutes to run one mile. Don’t be surprised if by the end of six weeks you are going considerably further.

Have fun, work hard and don’t forget to drop us a line with your results.

PAU for NOW

TAKU
www.hybridfitness.tv
www.blackjackfitness.com