PROTEIN PANCAKES:

It’s been a while since I added any recipes for your P.E.P.’s, so here is one I came up with just the other day.

HIGH PROTEIN PANCAKES: 

Ingredients:

4 large Eggs (I use organic).
1-Cup Cottage Cheese (I use organic).
1/4 cup Steel-Cut oats (I use organic).
1/4 Cup Raw Almonds (I use organic).
2 Tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil (I use organic).

Directions:

Grind up Oat’s and Almonds until they are fine (I use a coffee grinder but a food processor or even a blender will work).
Combine all ingredients and mix until smooth (I use a blender for this).

Cooking:

Heat a good pan to medium / high heat.
Add some oil to pan (I use extra virgin, Organic Coconut oil).
Drop Tbsp dollops of batter into pan for silver dollar pancakes (you can make them as big as you like).
Cook until you see bubbles coming through the entire pancake, then flip them over.
Brown other side (another 1-2 minutes or so)
Plate and enjoy.

If you’re feeling decadent add some Fresh Fruit, Maple Syrup, and even some fresh butter (I use Organic).

Enjoy!!

PAU for NOW

TAKU

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Simple Steps to Good Nutrition

By TAKU

Nutrition. Is there anything out there that is more confusing? High carbs, low carbs, good fats, bad fats, don’t eat at night, don’t eat anything but fruit until noon…It’s enough to make you scream. How can we possibly decipher all the nutritional mumbo-jumbo that is thrown around every day? Each time you turn around there is a new diet telling you what to eat and what to avoid.

Well, take a deep breath and let’s see if we can make some sense out of all this confusion. By the time your done reading, you’ll have at least a basic set of ideas that should work for you. It still won’t be easy. I have been training people for 25 years and I call nutrition, the ultimate discipline.

Let’s get some basics out of the way. We can break our food into a few basic components. Macro-nutrients (meaning Big stuff) and along with the big stuff we get Micro-nutrients (little stuff). Add water and you have your bases covered.

Foods contain calories in the form of the three Macro-nutrients, Fats, Proteins, and Carbohydrates. These calories provide energy for our bodies to move, grow, repair and maintain themselves. Both Protein and Carbohydrates have four calories per gram. Fat has more then twice as many calories with nine per gram. Foods also contain Micro-nutrients in the form of vitamins and minerals. Micro-nutrients are important because they contribute to the many chemical processes that our bodies undertake for daily living. They do not however provide energy.

When we say energy as it relates to food it just means calories. All food has calories and all calories can be burned to provide energy for the body. When we see something in the store called an “Energy” bar or Energy drink, it really just means that the bar or drink has calories. There is nothing magic about them. Most energy drinks have not only calories in the form of simple sugars but are also loaded with stimulants such as caffeine, guranna (an herbal form of caffeine) or other similar substances. This is where the “energy” comes from in the Zero calorie energy drinks. The above mentioned substances are Central Nervous System stimulants and are providing energy through a series of chemical interactions in the body. If you like to get the buzzed feeling of caffeinated drinks, but don’t like coffee then these types of drinks will do the trick for you. Just remember there are no magic substances in energy bars and drinks that will do anything for you that good, whole food cannot. For the most part these bars and drinks are just glorified candy bars and soda pops and their manufacturers are trying to get you to feel good about eating and drinking them.

I know that nutritional planning is a bit confusing at times. How many meals a day should I eat? Do I need a certain percentage of my daily calories from one source or another? What should I drink and how much is enough? Well, that is what we are here to find out. So let’s set some guidelines that will help us get the most out our nutrition. Keep in mind that what most people lack when it comes to nutrition is discipline and consistency. The following guidelines are not new or magic, they are merely ideas to help you establish a framework from which you may create that disciplined consistency you currently lack.

1. Eat every 2-3 hours, no matter what. You should eat between 4-5 times per day. This does not mean eat giant meals every time you feed; this includes your snacks as well. Think of it more like grazing.

2. Eat some source of lean protein such as eggs, chicken, beef, lamb, turkey and fish, at every meal.

3. Eat fruits and or vegetables with each meal. The more different colors and textures the better.

4. Ensure that your carbohydrate intake comes primarily from fruits and vegetables.

5. Ensure that you get some fats every day. You want these to be primarily in the form of good or “friendly” fats such as those found from olive, flax seed and coconut oils, avocados, raw nuts and seeds, as well as fish like salmon, mackerel, sardines anchovy’s etc.

6. Drink primarily non-calorie containing beverages, the best choices being water and green tea. A good goal for water intake is about half your body weight in ounces a day. So, if you weigh 100 pounds, aim for 50 ounces a day and if you weigh 200, pounds aim for 100 ounces a day. (The rest of you can do your own math).

7. Eat mostly whole foods. This means foods found in their most natural state. There is no such thing as a donut tree and contrary to popular belief; nothing made out of flour (like bread, pasta and bagels) is a source of complex carbohydrates.

8. When you get off track, regroup quickly. Having one bad meal or snack here and there will not have a large impact on your overall success. What does negatively impact you is the snow ball effect. That common feeling of “well I screwed up lunch so I guess the whole day is shot”. Forget that stuff. Your next feeding is your next opportunity for success.

So what does this type of eating look like? Here is a simple way to think about it. To create a healthy plate meal, simply view your plate like a clock. Fill the position of 12 o’clock to 6 o’clock with colorful fruits and vegetables; fill the space from 6 o’clock to 9 o’clock with carbohydrates like yams or sweet potatoes, and fill the area from 9 to 12 o’clock with lean protein  in the form of beef, chicken fish and so on.

Most of the time if you stick with just two sections, the fruit and veggie section and the protein section you’ll be doing just fine. If you do include starches, for best results don’t let that starch section get any bigger then about ¼ of your plate.

So, don’t I need to know how many calories I am eating and how much fat etc? The answer is yes and no. For the greatest long term success I would recommend taking a few days and figuring this stuff out. Working with a good nutrition coach can really help. The most important thing however is that you just start making some good simple choices right away. I think you’ll find that when you do, the rest starts to take care of itself.

Here is what a day of this type of eating might look like:

(I’ve included a few examples for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks)

Meal Examples

Breakfast:

1. Scrambled Eggs and Fruit. 1 whole egg. 2-3 egg whites. Tomato, peppers onions etc (your choice). 1 large orange.

2. Cottage Cheese and Fruit. 1-cup cottage cheese (low fat or non-fat). 2 cups Fresh or water packed Pineapple or Peaches. I Tbsp Almonds (raw).

3. Protein Shake. 2 scoops Protein Powder. 1 cup Strawberries, fresh or frozen. 2/3 cup peaches, fresh or frozen. 1-2 cups water. 1 -1/2 Tbsp Almonds or flax-seed oil

Lunch:

1. Tuna salad. 4-6 oz of Albacore Tuna in water (drained). 1-2 Tbsp of sweet pickle relish (optional). 3-5 Tbsp of celery (diced). 15-20 seedless grapes. 1-1/2 Tbsp Mayo (homemade or safflower). 2-4 lettuce leaves. 1 large apple.

2. Chicken Caesar salad. Romaine lettuce (3-4 cups). Chicken precooked and cooled (4 oz). Parmesan cheese 1 Tbsp (grated). Caesar dressing (2 Tbsp).*

3. Cantaloupe Fruit Salad. ½ of a melon. I cup cottage cheese (low fat or non-fat). 5-10 seedless Grapes. ½ cup sliced Strawberries. 2 tsp Sunflower seeds.

Dinner:

1. Chicken salad. 4-6 oz chicken. 2 tbsp walnuts. 1 apple chopped. 1-cup grapes (cut in halves). 2 tbsp mayo (safflower or home made). 1-cup green beans.

2. Grilled Salmon and Vegetables. Salmon steak grilled (4-1/2 oz). Onions sweet large size (3 thick slices). ½ green pepper (sliced). 1 zucchini (sliced). Green salad (2 cups). I cup Peaches, fresh or frozen for desert.

3. Beef Tenderloin Dinner. 6 oz extra lean beef. Asparagus spears (10 – steamed). 3-4 cups green salad with tomato. Fresh fruit for dessert.

Snacks:

1. Cottage cheese with Pineapple. 1-Cup cottage cheese w/ 1-cup pineapple.

2. Hard-boiled Egg and Fruit. 1 whole egg. 1 egg white. 1 tangerine or orange.

3. String Cheese and fruit. 1-2 string cheese. 1 apple.

If you are serious about your health, you should be serious about your nutrition. Our health comes from the inside out. Feed your body good food, drink water and get enough sleep every day and you have gone a long way to insuring optimal health and high function for years to come. When we eat well it supports everything else we do. It makes it that much more likely, that you will achieve your athletic and aesthetic goals as well as perform at your best in the boardroom or on the mat. Remember, every time you go food shopping is a chance for you to make great choices. Now get out there and get to it.

Bonus Food Shopping List:

Protein

Fish:

• Salmon

• Tuna

• Cod

• Trout

• Halibut

• Shrimp

• Scallops

Eggs

Chicken breasts

Cottage cheese

Lean Red Meat:

• Flank Steak

• Ground Beef

• Top Round Cuts

Carbohydrates

Vegetables (not limited to):

• Broccoli

• Green Beans

• Spinach

• Lettuce

Mixed Beans

Carbohydrates

Fruits (not limited to):

• Berries

• Apples

• Oranges

• Kiwi

• Grapefruits

Carbohydrates
Grains & Starches

Oatmeal/Oat bran

Sprouted Flour-less Mixed-grain bread

Brown Rice

Quinoa

Sweet Potatoes

Millet

Fats

Flax oil/Flax meal

Fish oil (EPA / DHA)

Olive oil / Olives

Mixed nuts:

• Almonds

• Walnuts

• Brazil

• Pistachios

Avocados

Coconut Oil

Butter (occasionally)

Macro Nutrient Servings:

Fruit. 1 serving =

1 medium sized fruit, ½ banana, 1-cup berries, ¼-cup dried fruit. 1-cup melon.

Veggies. 1 serving =

½ cup cooked or raw, 1 cup leafy.

Protein. 1 serving =

4-5 oz fish, poultry, pork or lean beef. 1-cup tofu, 1-cup cottage cheese.

Starchy Carbs. 1 serving =

½ cup cooked rice, pasta or grains, ½ cup cooked cereal.

BONUS RECIPE:

*Caesar Dressing:

• 1 Tbsp Olive Oil

• 1 Tbsp Red Wine Vinegar

• ½ Tbsp Lemon juice

• 1-2 cloves garlic, pressed

• ½ tsp Worcestershire sauce

• ½ tsp anchovy paste

• ½ tsp dry mustard

• ½ tsp fresh ground pepper

Place all ingredients in a jar and shake until blended.

 

PAU for NOW

TAKU

THE SECRET TO SUPER SIZE!

I’ve been keeping this to myself for years. It’e been the secret to both my success and the success of my clients. It’s why I have more happy clients than anyone else on the entire planet earth.

I didn’t want to share my secret…but finally after much serious thought, I’ve decided it’s time to let everyone in on the best kept secret in muscle & strength building.

People always ask professional trainers what supplements they recommend. Usually I just offer the basics, protein, fish-oil, maybe a good multi-vitamin. But now I am finally going to reveal the best supplement that no ne has told you about.

BULL URINE:

Yep, thats what I said…Bull Urine. How do you take it? You drink it ofcourse. I recocomend at least two liters per day if you are under 200lbs, and three liters per day if you are over 200lbs.

It has to be urine collected from free-range, grass-fed Belgian Blue bulls, and it needs to be harvested from their first relief of the day. Drink the first liter first thing in the morning on an empty stomach. As soon as you drink it, do one jumping jack, and then immediately sit down, close your eyes and breath deeply in and out for thirty seconds (inhale through the nose, and exhale through the mouth). Wait one hour, and then eat your normal breakfast.

After your workout of the day, follow the same procedure as the morning. This time wait just 20 minutes and then drink one pint of chocolate milk.

Follow this regimen cycling three weeks on, and one week off for 90 days. By the end of this time, most people will have gained a minimum of 10 lbs of lean muscle (some may gain as much as 25-30 lbs).

Well, there you have it. The best kept secret in the bodybuilding, strength training world. Who needs steroids when you can get Belgian Blure Urine?

PAU for NOW

TAKU

P.S. Oh yeah…What day is today? That’s right…APRIL 1st.

Truth Not Trends: NUTRITION / WEIGHT CONTROL

 

1. The bottom line: if the total number of calories consumed is less than the number used to support basal metabolism, thermo-genesis and activity energy demands, weight LOSS will occur. Likewise, weight GAIN will occur if calories consumed exceeds energy demands.

2. Due to their various functions within the body, the time-proven breakdown of the daily recommended percentages of the three macronutrients – carbohydrates (40-55%), proteins (20-30%) and fats (25-30%) – is still reasonable advice.

3. You can’t go wrong if these are on your grocery list: fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, high-fiber foods, skinless chicken and fish, lean red meat and anything low in saturated fat, high fructose corn syrup, white flour and sodium. Attempt to emphasize complex carbohydrates over simple sugars and go for lean, unsaturated proteins over high-fat proteins.

4. Nothing beats plain old water. 70% of your body is water. Drink periodically to stay hydrated. It’s literally free, for Pete’s sake.

5. Eat breakfast! If you skip it, then eat lunch at noon, you will have gone 12 -16 hours without food from the previous day! Skipping breakfast slows your metabolism, lowers your energy level, hinders muscle weight gain for those attempting to build muscle and encourages binge-eating later in the day.

6. Excessive alcohol consumption = dehydration, increased fat storage, lower strength levels and a greater risk of a D.U.I. None of those options are attractive.

7. Pre- and post-exercise feeding: pre-exercise = complex carbs + low in fat. Post-exercise = simple carbs + protein.

8. If you are attempting to lose body fat, a) strength train regularly (to keep metabolically expensive muscle), b) eat fewer calories spread out over 5 to 6 feedings each day (speeds metabolism and creates a calorie deficit) and c) be disciplined not to eat if feeling hungry between feedings (indicates your tapping fat storage sites).

9. 5 minutes of bad eating can negate 30 minutes of traditional exercise. 6 x chocolate chip cookies = 300 calories. 150 lb. man jogging at 10 miles/hour pace for 30 minutes = approximately 300 calories burned above BMR. Message: if you spend time “working out,” be disciplined in your eating.

10. More bang for the buck: try circuit strength training. Rather than plod away at a low-level for 30, 45 or 60 minutes on a treadmill, elliptical machine or running track, a more time-efficient 20-30 minute strength training circuit will not only use more calories per unit of time, it will also increase calorie consumption post-exercise due to a greater recovery demand placed on the body. Physically demanding circuit strength training is the total package: more muscle contractions = more energy expended, more muscle fibers overloaded = better muscle tone / strength, and the higher the intensity of work = the greater the demand placed on the cardio-vascular system.

TAKU’s NOTE: This weeks article courteousy of my friend Tom Kelso.

PAU for NOW

TAKU

 

Baked Whole Chicken with a Blast of Garlic

By TAKU

 Anyone who knows me personally, knows that as far as I am concerned you can never have too much garlic. It’s been a while since I posted any recipes so today I present my baked Garlic Chicken.

    1. Chicken 1 whole (about 3 – 4 lbs)
    1. Garlic one whole bulb (more is always better)
    1. Onion 1-2 (quartered)
    1. Extra Virgin olive oil 2-3 tbsp
    1. Fresh rosemary 2 Heaping tsp
    1. Celtic salt 1/2 tsp
    1. Fresh ground black pepper 1 Heaping tsp

Position a rack in the center of the oven. Preheat oven to 400. Remove the neck and giblets from chicken then wash and dry thoroughly. Peel the garlic and chop in to small, sharp slivers. Using a sharp knife, poke holes about 1-2″ deep through the skin and into the meat of the chicken. Stuff the slivers of garlic deep into the holes you have created in the chicken. Take your time and make as many holes as possible. Do your best to use up all the garlic. Take the onions and stuff them inside the body of the chicken. Fill it as full as possible. Mix the olive oil, rosemary, salt and pepper together in a small bowl. Spread the oil and spice mixture all over the skin of the chicken. Bake in oven until cooked through usually about 45-55 minutes. Remove and let stand about ten minutes before serving.

For a bonus, make some baked garlic bulbs why you are at it. All you need to do is get a few large garlic bulbs, slice off the tops and baste them in olive oil. Pop them in the oven with the chicken, during the last 10-15 minutes of baking. Roasted garlic is milder than raw garlic. In fact, raw garlic is two to four times stronger in flavor. Garlic becomes very mellow and easy to spread after cooking. Roasted garlic makes a delicious appetizer. Squeeze the pulp out of the cloves and spread on the bread of your liking or serve with bruschetta and/or tapenade. Roasted garlic is also excellent used in your baking.

Enjoy the wonderful flavors…

PAU for NOW

TAKU

© 2006-2009 HybridFitness.tv. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction without permission prohibited.

Fruit Smoothie Recipes

I am a fan of smoothies. I eat at least one almost every day. People often ask for good recipes, so here are just a few of my favorites. The secret to any recipe is to tweak it until it suits you. Some like thicker, some prefer thinner. Keep playing with the ingredients until you make it your own.

O.J. Smoothie:

Combine the following ingredients in a high-speed blender:

1/2 cup Orange juice

1 Orange (peeled)

3/4 cup water and/or ice

2-1/2 tbsp Almonds sliced/or 1 tbsp flax oil

30-40 grams Whey Protein

*Blend on High until smooth

**Add additional water to reach desired consistency

Blueberries Smoothie:

Combine the following ingredients in a high-speed blender:

1-1/2 cups blueberries

1/2-cup water and/or ice

30-40 grams Whey protein

2-1/2 tbsp Almonds sliced OR1 tbsp flax oil

*Blend on High until smooth

**Add additional water to reach desired consistency

Berry Smoothie:

Combine the following ingredients in a high-speed blender:

• 10 oz. of plain whole milk yogurt, kefir or coconut milk/cream

• 1-2 raw high omega-3 whole eggs (optional)

• 1 Tbsp. of extra virgin coconut oil

• 1 Tbsp. of flaxseed or hempseed oil

• 1-2 Tbsps. unheated honey

• 1-2 scoops (1/4-1/2 cup). protein powder (optional)

• 1-2 cups of fresh or frozen berries

*Blend on High until smooth

**Add additional water to reach desired consistency

Properly prepared, this smoothie is an extraordinary source of easy-to-absorb nutrition. It contains large amounts of “live” enzymes, probiotics, vitally important “live” proteins, and a full spectrum of essential fatty acids. Smoothies should be consumed immediately or refrigerated for up to 24 hours. If frozen in ice cube trays with a toothpick inserted into each cube, smoothies can make for a great frozen dessert.

Feel free to play around with different berry combinations. You might find something you really like.

Send us an email with your best creation. We’ll post it in a future article and make sure you get credit for it!

Happy Blending!

PAU for NOW

TAKU

© 2006-2009 HybridFitness.tv. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction without permission prohibited.

Low Carb Dieting (the truth): Part 2

The body derives it’s energy from four key fuels:

1) glucose

2) proteins

3) free fatty acids

4) ketones

The primary determinant of the fuel utilized is the availability of carbohydrate.The body has three storage units that can be utilized during times of calorie deprivation:

1) Carbohydrate, which is stored in liver and the muscles

2) Protein, which can be converted to glucose in the liver

3) Fat, which is stored primarily in adipose tissue.

Under specific conditions a fourth fuel comes into play -ketones which are derived from the incomplete breakdown of free fatty acids. Under normal dietary conditions ketones play a minimal role in energy prodcition. During times of Low carb dieting or starvation diets ketones impact energy production significantly.

When looking at storage of bodily fuels triglyceride is the most abundant. Carrbohydrate stiores are minimal compared to protein and fat. Although stored protein could possibly fuel the body longer than stored carbohydrates too much reliance and protein for energy could result in death. The average person has enough body fat to live for months without food. There are numerous documented cases where morbidly obese patients were fasted for up to one year.

In gereral the body utilizes the fuel that is most abundant in the bloodstream. As an example when glucose elevates in the bloodstream the body will utilize mostly glucose. When glucose levels begin to lower the body uses less glucose. When decreasing carbohydrate availability the body begins a metabolic shift resulting in a higher dpendence on fat for energy.

Many trainees like to point to the fact that a high carb diet is protein sparing. Keep in mind while a high carb diet is protein sparing it is also fat sparing. High levels of carbohydrates decrease the use of fat for fuel.

In the initial days of fasting prtein is converted to glucose. This is where some people formed the idea that low carb diets were muscle wasting. With an adequate amount of protein intake these muscle wasting effects can be minimized in the early stages of the diet. As the body becomes ketogenic protein is spared.

Most tissues of the body can use FFA for fuel. Although, there are tissues that cannot utilize FFA for fuel including brain, red blood cells, renal medulla, bone marrow and type 2 muscle fibers. One of the biggest mis-conceptions about human physiology is the belief that the brain can only run on glucose. Under normal dietary conditions the brain primarily functions by using glucose, but under conditions of ketosis the brain can run efficiently by using ketone bodies. Arguably the most important tissue in terms of ketone body usage is the brain which can derive up to 75% of it’s energy requirements from ketone bodies once adaptation occurs. Other research indicates that ketone bodies are the preferred fuel of many tissues. One exception is the liver which does not use ketones for fuel, but relies on FFA.

There are several factors which influence the fuel used by the body.

Factors influence fuel utilization

1. Amount of each nutrient being consumed

2. Level of hormones such as insulin and glucagon

3. Bodily stores of each nutrient

4. Levels of regulatory enzymes for glucose and fat breakdown

Amount of nutrient being consumed

There are four substances that we dervie calories from. These include:

1) carbohydrate

2) protein

3) fats

4) alcohol

Generally speaking, the body utilizes glucose in direct proportion to the amount of carbohydrate being consumed. If carb intake increases the bodies utilization increases and vice-versa.

When protein intake increases protein oxidation will also increase to a degree. If protein intake drops the body will use less protein for fuel. The body attempts to maintain body protein at constant levels.

The amount of dietary fat being consumed does not significantly increase the amount of fat used for fuel by the body. Fat burning is determined indirectly by alcohol and carbohydrate consumption. The consumption of alcohol will almost completely inhibit the bodies ability to burn fat for fuel. The greatest rates of fat oxidation will occur when carbohydrates and alcohol are limited. Levels of muscle glycogen also regulate how much fat is used by the muscle.

HORMONES

Insulin’s primary role is to keep blood glucose in a range of 80-120 mg/dl. When blood glucose raises above 120 the pancreas releases insulin to lower blood glucose. The greatest increase of blood glucose come after the consumption of carbohydrate (different types have differing effects). Protein causes a smaller increase in insulin output because some individual amino acids can be converted to glucose. FFAs and ketones can also stimulate an insulin response, but the response is a great deal less than that which comes from the consumption of protein or carbs.

As blood glucose drops insulin levels decrease as well. With the decrease in insulin the body begins to break down stored fuels. Fat cells are broken down into glycerol and FFAs and released into the bloodstream. Proteins are broken down into individual amino acids and glycogen stored in the liver is broken down into glucose and released into the bloodstream.

Glucagon is a hormone released from the pancreas that acts to control blood glucose as well. Glucagon acts to raise blood glucose when it drops below normal. Glucagon’s main action is in the liver as it breaks down liver glycogen and releases it into the blood stream. Glucagon also plays an important role in ketone body formation in the liver. Glucagon released is stimulated by exercise, decreasing blood glucose and insulin and protein consumption. Elevated levels of insulin inhibut the pancreas from releasing glucagon

From the information provided above it is apparent that insulin and glucagon play antagonist roles to one another. Insulin is primarly a storage hormone: while glucagons’s primary role is to moblilze fuel stores for use by the body.

Growth hormone is another hormone which has numerous effects on the body. GH is released in response to exercise, a decrease in blood glucose, and carb restriction or fasting. GH is a growth promoting hormone increasing protein synthesis in the muscle and liver. GH also acts as a FFA mobilizer.

Most of the anabolic effects of GH are mediated through a class of hormones called insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). IGF-1 is the key contributor to anabolic growth in most of the bodies tissues. GH stimulates the liver to produce IGF-1 but only in the presence of insulin. High GH levels in combination with high insulin levels (protein carb meal) will raise IGF-1 levels increasing anabolic reactions in the body. On the other end high GH levels with low insulin levels will not cause and increase in IGF-1 levels.

The thyroid gland produces two hormones, thyroxine (T4), and triidothyronine (T3). In the human body T4 is primarily a storage form of T3 and plays few physiological roles itself. Thyroid hormones can have an effect on all tissues of the body. Chronically low carb intake can significantly lower thyroid hormone.

Cortisol is a catabolic hormone released by the adrenal glands. Cortisol is involved in gluconeogenesis as well as fat breakdown. Cortisol is required for life but excessive amounts can be detrimental to health causing protein breakdown, bone tissue degradation, immune system impairment, connective tissue and skin weakening.

Adrenaline and noradrenaline (epinephrine and norepinephrine) are released from the adrenal glands and are frequently referred to as fight or flight hormones. These hormones are generally released in response to cold, exercise, or fasting. Epinephrine is released from the adrenal medulla, while nor epinephrine is released primarily from the nerve terminals. The primary role the adrenal hormones adrenaline and nor – adrenaline play in the ketogenic diet is to stimulate free fatty acid release from fat cells.

In humans, insulin and adrenaline and nor-adrenaline have the most profound effect on fat mobilization. In general, insulin acts as storage hormone while adrenaline and nor-adrenaline stimulate fat breakdown.

LIVER GLYCOGEN

All foods coming through the digestive tract are processed initially in the liver. In general, liver glycogen is the key determinant of the body’s tendency to store or breakdown nutrients. There is a direct correlation between liver glycogen levels and bodyfat levels. High levels of liver glycogen are usually related to higher bodyfat levels.

The liver serves as a storehouse for glycogen. Liver glycogen is broken down in response to glucagon and released into the bloodstream. When liver glycogen is full the body is generally in an anabolic state. Incoming nutrients are stored as glycogen, proteins, and triglycerides. This is sometimes called the fed state.

When liver glycogne is depleted the liver shifts roles and becomes catabolic. Glycogen is broken down into glucose, protein is broken down into amino acids, and triglycerides are broken down into FFA’s. This is often referred to as the fasted state.

Ketogenesis will occur when liver glycogen is depleted, blood glucose drops, and the insulin/glucagon ratio shifts.

ENZYME LEVELS

Enzyme levels are primarily determined by the nutrients being ingested in the diet and the hormonal levels that result from the ingestion. When carb intake is high and glucose and glycogen storage is stimulated the enzymes involved in fat breakdown are inhibited. On the other hand when insulin drops the enzymes involved with glucose use are inhibited and the enzymes involved in fat breakdown will increase.

Relevant research in regards to ketogenic dieting

A comparative study of two diets in the treatment of primary exogenous obesity in children

Pena L, Pena M, Gonzalez J, Claro A,

One hundred and four children, ages six to fourteen with exogenous obesity were subjected to two different diets, Ketogenic (low carb) and hypocaloric, for eight weeks.Body weight, serum triglycereides, cholesterol, glucose tolerance test, blood glucose, and plasma insulin determination were measured before and after diets. The results revealed significant differences in bodywt, and triglyceride concentration, with both diets. There were significant differences in the fasting insulin levels, insulinogenic index, and insulin concentration after a glucose tolerance test in the patients treated with a KD diet.

LOW CARB DIETING (THE TRUTH)

SEMINAR BY JAMIE HALE

AUG 20TH FITNESS ZONE LEXINGTON KY

© 2006-2009 HybridFitness.tv. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction without permission prohibited.