TEMPORARILY CLOSED

Hey there…thanks for stopping by. Due to some family obligations I am temporarily not adding any new content. There are literally hundreds of articles to choose from in my archives, going all the way back to 2008. Please take a moment to look around, I am sure you will find stuff worth exploring.  I’ll be back soon with new content for you to enjoy.

PAU for NOW

TAKU

Nutrition: Two simple steps to improve your fitness program.

If you visit here often, then you should know how I feel about the importance of strength training. However, if you want to lose fat, nutrition is certainly something in addition to strength training to work on.

I’ve got personal experience in this area. Along with my multiple Strength and Conditioning certifications, I am also a certified sports nutritionist. Over the years I’ve designed, implemented and updated hundreds of fully customized eating programs for a broad array of fitness participants from elite athletes to average Joe’s. It’s beyond the scope of this article to get too in depth into the specific details of creating custom Personal Eating Plans, but I do want to mention a couple of very useful principles for nutrition if someone wants to get leaner and lose fat.

1. Cut out the sugar: Limiting simple carbs is the best place to start for almost everyone when creating a new Personal Eating Plan (P.E.P.). For many, just getting rid of all the sources of simple and or processed carbs in their P.E.P. will quickly see them dropping unwanted pounds.

2. Total calories do matter: Despite what many “Clean eating” diet guides recommend or suggest, total calories do matter. It is absolutely possible to over-eat on healthy food choices. If after eliminating the sugar from your P.E.P. you are still not losing body fat, (or not losing as much as you would like) then it’s time to actually pay attention to the total calories you are consuming. Keep in mind that as we age, total caloric needs often decline.

Where should you start? In my experience I’ve found that for those requiring reduced calorie intake the following guidelines were extremely helpful:

Nutrition Guidelines*

Moderate Calorie: 1500-1800 men; 1200-1500 women

High Protein: 1.5 grams protein x 50% ideal body weight

High Water: 1 oz. x 50% ideal body weight

High Vegetables: unlimited servings (within daily calorie guidelines)

Moderate Fruit: Limited servings (within daily calorie guidelines)

Example based on the above guidelines:

Female with ideal target weight of 130 pounds.

Protein = 100 grams minimum daily (1.5 grams x 65*)

Water = 65 oz. minimum daily (1 oz. x 65)

Begin with meeting protein intake requirements. Then add Fruit & Vegetable and friendly fat while remaining within daily calorie guidelines.

PAU for NOW

TAKU

For those interested in fully customized Personal Eating Plans contact TAKU at: strengthonline@yahoo.com Put NUTRITION in the subject line.

*rounded up for convenience.

Low Carb Dieting (the truth): Part 1

Almost everyone knows someone who has used a low carb diet. They have used it themselves had a friend use it or are getting ready to use it . Are these diets magic? Are they safe? Can I really eat all of the cheese and meat I want ? Will I die if I go into ketosis?

These are just a few common questions I hear in regards to questions that concern low carb diets. In this series of articles I will present readers with scientific facts and my practical observations for implications concerning low carb diets. Some low carb supporters will not like what I will have to say. Some low carb haters will not like what I have to say. The objective of these articles are to educate readers on the practical implications of low carb dieting. Some will be offended and some will say how can that be. Either way sit back and enjoy as I attempt to shed light on the highly talked about topic – low carb diets (ketogenic diets)

I have provided a brief overview of some the topics that will be discussed in this series of articles.

1. What type of changes occur while using low carb diets

2. Do low carb diets make me mean

3. Do low carb diets spare muscle

4. Can I gain weight on a low carb diet

5. How much weight can I expect to lose

6. Can this diet help my medical condition

7. Different types of low carb diets

8. Why you need to cycle higher days of carbs

9. Who needs low carb diets

10. Are they safe for children

11. Are they beneficial for athletes

The topics mentioned above are just a few that will be addressed in Low Carb Dieting.

Before we move any further let me introduce the word ketogenic. Must of you reading this article are probably familiar with the world as it implies low carb or restriction of carb intake. Simply put for our purposes the words ketogenic and low carb are synonymous. A couple of other comments I would like to make before we move on. This comment is for Low Carb supporters that swear of all vegetables and fruits. Get on medline.com and do some research. Go to the library and look through some journals. A complete diet for long term use needs to incorporate greens and some fruits to be healthy. A short term diet devoid of fruits and vegetables might not be that bad, but rejecting greens and any fruits for life is a bad idea.

This comment is for the low carb haters. One of the number one reasons most of America is fat is because of chronically high insulin levels. Which is primarily contributed to excessive carb intake. Don’t get me wrong I am not blaming high carbohydrate intake on all of our obesity problems. I should probably say excessive and the wrong types of carbohydrate at the wrong times are the problem. At the same time the answer is not to eat all of the saturated fat we can find : which can contribute to insulin insensitivity, elevated TG’s, increased lipogenesis and digestive problems.

What is a ketogenic diet? A diet that causes ketone bodies to be produced by the liver, and shifts the body’s metabolism away from glucose in favor of fat burning. A ketogenic diet restricts carbohydrates below a certain level (generally 100 per day). The ultimate determinant of whether a diet is ketogenic or not is the presence or absence of carbohydrate. Protein and fat intake vary. Contrary to poplar belief eating fat is not what causes ketosis. In the past starvation diets were used often to induce ketosis. I will repeat myself again and say lack of carbohydrate or presence of ultimately determines if the diet is ketogenic.

In most eating plans the body runs on a mixture of protein, fats and carbohydrates. When carbohydrates are severely restricted and glycogen storage (glucose in muscle and liver) is depleted the body begins to utilize other means to provide energy. FFA (free fatty acids) can be used to provide energy, but the brain and nervous system are unable to use FFA’s. Although the brain can use ketone bodies for energy.

Ketone bodies are by products of incomplete FFA breakdown in the liver. Once they begin to accumulate fast and reach a certain level they are released , accumulated in the bloodstream and cause a state called ketosis. As this occurs there is a decrease in glucose production and utilization. There is also less reliance on protein to meet energy requirements by the body. Ketogenic diets are often referred to as protein sparing as they help to spare LBM whiled dropping body fat.

In regards to ketogenic diets there are two primary hormones- insulin, glucagon that need to be considered. Insulin can be described as a storage hormone as it’s job is to take nutrients out of the bloodstream and carry them to target tissues. Insulin carries glucose from the blood to the liver and muscles, and it carries FFA from the blood into adipose tissue (stored fat triglyceride). On the other hand glucagon breaks down glycogen stores (especially in the liver) and releases them into the blood.

When carbs are restricted or removed insulin levels drop while glucagon levels rise. This causes enhanced FFA release from fat cells, and increased FFA burning in the liver. This accelerated burning of FFA in the liver is what leads to ketosis. There are a number of other hormones involved with this process as well.

In general we refer to three different types of ketogenic diets.

1. STANDARD KETOGENIC DIET- A diet containing l00 or less grams of carbohydrates is referred to as STANDARD KETOGENIC DIET

2. TARGETED KETOGENIC DIET- consuming carbohydrates around exercise, to sustain performance without affecting ketosis.

3. CYCLICAL KETOGENIC DIET- alternates periods of ketogenic dieting with periods of high carbohydrate intake

The Beginning of Ketogenic diets

Originally ketogenic diets were used to treat obesity and epilepsy. In general ketogenic diets are similar to starvation diets in the responses that occur in the body. More specifically these two states can be referred to as starvation ketosis and dietary ketosis. These similarities have led to the development of modern day ketogenic diets.

Ketogenic dieting has been used for years in the treatment of childhood epilepsy. In the early 1900’s times of total fasting was used to treat seizures. This caused numerous health problems and could not be sustained indefinitely.

Due to the impracticalities and health problems occurring with starvation ketogenic diets researchers began to look for a way to mimic starvation ketosis while consuming food. They determined that a diet consisting of high fat, low carb and minimal protein could sustain growth and maintain ketosis for a long period of time. This led to the birth of the original ketogenic diet in 1921 by Dr. Wilder. Dr Wilder’s diet controlled pediatric epilepsy in many cases where drugs and other treatments failed.

New epilepsy drugs were invented during the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s and ketogenic diets fell to the wayside. These new drugs lead to almost disappearance of ketogenic diets during this time. A few modified ketogenic diets were tried during this time such as the MCT (medium chain triglycerides) diets, but they were not welly accepted.

In 1994 the ketogenic diet as a treatment for epilepsy was re-discovered. This came about in the story of Charlie a 2yr old with seizures that could not be controlled with medications or other treatment including brain surgery. Charlie’s father had found reference to the diet through his research and ended up at Johns Hopkins medical center.

Charlie’s seizures were completely controlled as long as he was on the diet. The huge success of the diet prompted Charlie’s father to start the Charlie foundation. The foundation has produced several videos, and published the book The Epilepsy Diet Treatment: An Introduction to the Ketogenic diet. The foundation has sponsored conferences to train physicians and dietitians to implement the diet. The exact mechanisms of how the ketogenic diet works to control epilepsy are still unknown, the diet continues to gain acceptance as an alternative to drug therapy.

Obesity

Ketogenic diets have been used for at least a century for weight loss. Complete starvation was studied often including the research of Hill, who fasted a subject for 60 days to examine the effects. The effects of starvation were very successful in regards to treatment of the morbidly obese as rapid weight loss occurred. Other characteristics attributed to ketosis, such as appetite suppression and sense of well being, made fasting even more attractive for weight loss. Extremely obese patients have been fasted for up to one year and given nothing but vitamins and minerals. The major problem with complete starvation diets is the loss of body protein, primarily from muscle tissue. Protein losses decrease as starvation continues, but up to one half of the total weight loss can be contributed to muscle and water loss. In the early 1970’s Protein Sparing Modified Fasts were introduced. These diets allowed the benefits of ketosis to continue while preventing losses of bodily proteins. They are still used today under medical supervision In the early 70’s Dr. Atkins introduced Dr. Atkins Diet Revolution With millions of copies Sold the diet generated a great deal of interest. Dr. Atkins suggested a diet limited in carbohydrate but unlimited in protein and fat. He promoted the diet as it would allow rapid weight loss, no hunger and unlimited amounts of protein and fat. He offered just enough research to allow the diet recognition. Although most of the evidence supporting the diet was questionable. During the 1980’s Michael Zumpano and Dan Duchaine introduced two of the earliest CKD’s THE REBOUND DIET for muscle gain and then the modified version called THE ULTIMATE DIET for fat loss. Neither diet became very popular. This was likely due to the difficulty of the diet and the taboo of eating high fat. In the early 90’s Dr. Dipasquale introduced the ANABOLIC DIET . This diet promoted 5 days of high- fat-high protein-low carb consumption while eating high carbs and virtually anything you wanted for two days. The diet was proposed to induce a metabolic shift within the five days of eating low carbs (30 or less). The metabolic shift occurred as your body switched from being a sugar burning machine to a fat-burning machine. A few years later Dan Duchaine released the book UNDERGROUND BODYOPUS: MILITIANT WEIGHT LOSS AND RECOMPOSITION . The book included his CKD diet which he called BODY OPUS. The diet was more specified than the Anabolic Diet and gave exercise recommendations as well as the basics concerning exercise physiology. Most bodybuilders found the diet very hard to follow. The carb load phase required eating every 2 hrs and certain foods were prescribed. I personally loved the book, but felt the difficulty of the diet made it less popular. In this author’s opinion Ducahine’s book is a must read for anyone interested in Nutrition. Ketogenic Diets have been used for years to treat specific conditions such as obesity and childhood epilepsy. The effects of these diets have proven beneficial in a number of these well documented cases, but for some reason when we mention any type of low carb diet (ketogenic diet) people begin to tell us about how their doctor or friend told them it would kill them or how that diet was shown to damage the liver or kidneys. Keep in mind epileptic children have been in ketosis for up to three years and shown no negative effects; quiet the opposite. The weight loss in morbidly obese patients has been tremendous and the health benefits numerous. Maybe before coming to the conclusion that all types of ketogenic diets are bad other factors need to be considered such as activity levels, type of ketogenic diet, length of ketogenic diet, past eating experience, purpose of ketogeninc diet, individual body type and response to various eating plans, current physical condition, and quality of food while following ketogenic diet. As you can see there are numerous factors that come into play when saying a diet is good or bad. I think people should take the time look at the research and speak with various authorities in regards to low carb diets before drawing conclusions from the they says.

Relevant research in regards to ketogenic dieting

Efficacy and safety of the ketogenic diet for intractable childhood epilepsy: Korea multi-centric experience

Chul Kang H, Joo Kim Y, Wook Kim D, Dong Kim H,

Dept of pediatrics, Epilepsy center, Inje Univ Coll of Med, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul Korea

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the safety of the ketogenic diet, and to evaluate the prognosis of the patients after successful discontinuation of the diet in infants, children and adolescents with refractory epilepsy. The study looked at patients who had been treated with KD during 1995 through 2003 at Korean multicenters. The outcomes of the 199 patients enrolled in the study at 6 and 12 months were as follows: 68% and 46% of patients remained on the diet, 58% and 41% showed a reduction in seizures, including 33% and 25% who became seizure free. The complications were mild during the study, but 5 patients died during the KD. No significant variables were related to the efficacy, but those with symptomatic and partial epilepsies showed more frequent relapse after completion of the diet. The researchers concluded the KD is a safe and effective alternative therapy for intractable epilepsy in Korea, although the customary diet contains substantially less fat than traditional Western diets, but life-threatening complications should be monitored closely during follow up.

Reference

McDonald, L (1998) The Ketogenic Diet. Lyle McDonald.

Copyright 2005 Jamie Hale

LOW CARB DIETING (THE TRUTH)

SEMINAR conducted by Jamie Hale

Date- Aug 20th Location-Fitness Zone Lexington Ky

© 2006-2009 HybridFitness.tv. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction without permission prohibited.

Eating Plan to Pack on Muscle Without the Fat

Let’s face it; eating plans are not always about losing weight. Some of us would like to add as much muscle as possible while still maintaining a solid physique. Many folks will argue that you can not add muscle and stay lean at the same time. This simply is not true. If you are serious about your goals and follow a well structured, cyclical P.E.P., you can add muscle while maintaining a lean, athletic body.

This P.E.P. is a weekly plan which requires specific eating patterns be followed on specific days. Each weekly cycle is the same. Days 1-3 are high protein / low carb days. Day 4 is a moderate protein / high carb day. Days 5-7 are high carb / high protein days. I recommend that you follow this type of plan for 8-12 weeks and then return to a more balanced approach like my Basic Eating Plan. Keep in mind that when ever one adds new lean mass then daily and weekly calories and macro-nutrient ratios must be re-calibrated to take into account the new you.

Below is an example of what the weekly schedule might look like on a day by day, meal by meal basis.

DAY(s) 1-3 = High Protein / Low Carbs

Meal 1. Omelet with 4 whole eggs, 4 strips of Bacon or Sausage. Feel free to use butter or any “friendly” oil of your choice (Olive, Walnut etc)

Meal 2. 2 scoop Whey Protein + 1 Tbsp Flax Oil in 10 Oz water

Meal 3. 8 Oz grilled Chicken breast or Turkey

Meal 4. Protein drink as above

Meal 5. Steak 10 Oz (or other lean meat) with veggies, salad & avocado

Meal 6. Protein drink as above

Cal = 1854 / Protein = 200g / Carbs = 30g / Fat = 107g

DAY 4 = Mod Protein / High Carbs

Meal 1. Oatmeal (16 Oz cooked), 5 dates, 1 whole Banana (chopped & stirred into oatmeal)

Meal 2. “Power Shake” 8 Oz non-fat milk, 8 Oz Orange Juice, 1 Banana (mix in blender)

Meal 3. Roasted chicken (6 Oz), rice (1 cup), beans (6 Oz), Sherbet (3 scoops)

Meal 4. Cottage cheese (1 cup), Pineapple (canned in own juice) 1 cup, Mandarin Oranges 1/2 cup

Meal 5. Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwich,(1 Tbsp P-nut-butter + 1 Tbsp jelly on sprouted (flour-less) bread), 1cup non-fat milk, 1 Banana, 1 apple

Meal 6. . “Power Shake” 8 Oz non-fat milk, 8 Oz Orange Juice, 1 Banana (mix in blender)

Cal = 3674 / Protein = 159g / Fat = 62g / Carbs = 560g

DAY(S) 5-7 = High Protein / High Carbs

Meal 1. Non-fat milk (8 Oz), Oatmeal (8 Oz cooked), 3 egg whites (stirred into oatmeal), 5 dates (chopped & stirred into oatmeal)

Meal 2. “Power Shake” 8 Oz non-fat milk, 8 Oz Low-fat yogurt, 1 Banana (mix in blender)

Meal 3. Roasted chicken (6 Oz), rice (1 cup), beans (6 Oz), Sherbet (3 scoops)

Meal 4. Cottage cheese (1 cup), Pears (canned in own juice) 4 halves

Meal 5. Peanut butter sandwich 1 Tbsp P-nut-butter + 1 Tbsp jelly on sprouted (flour-less) bread, non-fat milk (1 cup) 1 Banana

Meal 6. Tuna sandwich (tuna packed in water) on sprouted (flour-less) bread, 1 apple, handful of nuts (your favorite)

Meal 7. “Power Shake” 8 Oz non-fat milk, 8 Oz Low-fat yogurt, 1 Banana (mix in blender)

Cal = 3586 / Protein = 211 / Fat = 69 / Carbs = 527

Remember, the goal of this plan is to add new lean mass (muscle) to your body while maintaining or perhaps even lowering your current body-fat percentage. If your current body-fat is above 10-12 %, then I recommend that you get a little leaner before attempting this plan. Try my lower carb, weight loss plan the Cyclical Ketogenic Diets made easy.

This plan is an example of how to properly structure your feedings to get big without getting fat. However, all eating plans require a break in period in order to dial in the specifics for your body. Be prepared to spend a couple of weeks fine tuning things to get the most out of your plan. Keeping a food journal will really help here.

Finally, for this plan to work, it must be accompanied by heavy, intense weight training. You will not get bigger and stronger by adjusting your P.E.P. alone. For ideas on workouts that will pair nicely with this P.E.P. follow the links at the bottom of this article.

P.S. Don’t forget that rest and recovery are just as important as the actual workouts themselves

CLASSIC H.I.T.

FOUR QUARTERS

FOUR WEEK STRENGTH CYCLE

PAU for NOW

TAKU

Slow and steady?

By now, almost everyone knows that I am a big fan of brief, intense, and efficient training methods for both strength and conditioning. In my opinion High Intensity Strength Training, with maximal efforts, and minimal rest periods, is the ultimate tool to achieve Super fitness.

For years I have been recommending intense interval style training, as well as high intensity circuit strength training, to my clients who are trying to lose body fat in the shortest time possible. This style of training is the ultimate means to drive metabolic cost and maximize caloric expenditure.

This week we look at some interesting research that support these ideas:*


Examining Matched Acute Physiological Responses to Various Modes of Exercise in Individuals Who Are Overweight

James E. Clark

Purpose: To perform match comparison of 3 different exercise programs: traditional continuous endurance training (ET); mixed-intensity interval endurance training (MI-ET) and circuit-interval resistance training (CRT) programs, to determine which of the three programs provides greater benefit of exercise in individuals who are overweight.

Conclusions: The MI-ET program spent a greater percent of training time within a favorable training zone than CRT and ET programs.  The MI-ET and CRT programs produced greater caloric expenditure than the ET program, with no statistical difference between the MI-ET and CRT programs.  Although the CRT program produces the greatest overall caloric expenditure, the MI-ET program produces measures that provided significantly greater benefit of exercise for the 3 programs of interest.

IN PLAIN ENGLISH:  If you want to maximize energy expenditure to facilitate fat-loss, choose more intense interval-type training and/or circuit strength training as opposed to walking on a treadmill or running at a low-level continuous pace.

PAU for NOW

TAKU

* Thanks to my friend Tom Kelso for sharing the awesome information he has at his home page.

P.S. (click on Tom’s name above, so that you can drop by his sight, and explore for yourself).


Workout in a hurry

6 weeks to a new you in the New Year (Part two)

In part one of this article I told you that we could re-shape your body in as little as 15 workouts over just six weeks. Having read part one you should have taken all of your photos and measurements as well as outlined your eating for the first few weeks of the plan. You should also know how many push-ups and sit-ups you can do as well as your time for a wall sit and how far you can run in 30 seconds. In part two I am going to outline the nuts and bolts of the plan as well as answer some basic questions and give options for those who may have limited access to workout equipment or who want to do their training bare-bones, boot-camp style; outside or at home.

We don’t have a lot of time. That is why we are using this plan in the first place. Let me reassure you it is not about the quantity but the quality of effort that is put forth that makes this type of training so efficient and effective. The workouts themselves are going to be brief and infrequent and therefore should be done with the utmost intensity. Don’t be intimidated by that word. Even if you are a beginner or coming back from a lay off you can work out hard enough to get great results. The secret is to try as hard as you can at the moment. As you recover and adapt each week, you will find that you are able to step it up a little more.

The workout will be done as follows. Each training day you will focus on a certain body region along with your cardio and stretching. None of these workouts should ever take longer then an hour including the warm-up, stretching and cool-down. In fact 45 – 50 minutes will probably be all you need as your fitness improves over the next few weeks. When I make recommendations for how many sets you should perform you will notice that I say one set. In my experience one good set is all you need to have success. Some people just can not seem to handle this approach and feel they need more. If you choose to do more keep this in mind. For each set you add you are using up more of your bodies recovery ability as well as increasing the total time you spend working out. The whole reason we are doing this workout is because we are in a hurry; so trust me and just do one set as hard as you can.

For the cardio portion of your training plan, your job is also to work as hard as you can in the moment. Whatever machine you choose to use I want you to go as far as possible in 15 minutes. I find that 15 minutes is all you need if you are really working as hard as you can. The cardio session is broken down as follows: You wont need to warm-up because you just finished your strength training session. So, pick a machine and work as hard and fast as you can for 12 minutes and then cool-down for about 3 minutes.

Do not increase the length of time you do cardio, just do your best to cover more distance then you did last time. How will you know how far you went? Look at the machine. Most of these machines will give you a distance read out. If not then use calories as your guide. If you burn more calories during the same length of time that means you are working harder then before.

Each time you train, be sure to write down everything you do in the gym. Write down how much you lifted in each exercise and when you can do more then 10 reps in any exercise, add some weight. Write down the distance you covered or the number of calories burned in your cardio session and strive to go further or burn more next time. Every little increase is significant. Be sure to keep the time you do your cardio consistent so that the calorie and distance numbers are accurate from session to session. Remember you are only working really hard for about 12 minutes.

The Workouts:

Workout 1. Lower body:

5 minute warm-up treadmill, bike, or rower

Squats 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell Lateral Lunges 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell Lunges to the rear 1 x 6-10 (each leg)

Straight leg dead-lifts 1 x 6-10

Single leg calf raise 1 x 6-10 (each leg)

Mid-section: Hanging knee raise or incline knee raise, low back extension, band or pulley rotations. 1 x 8-15

Cardio: Machine of your choice for max distance or calories in 12 minutes

Cool-Down: 3 minutes

Stretch: 5-10 minutes full body

Workout 2. Pushing (two days after workout 1.)

5 minute warm-up on treadmill, bike, or rower

Flat Dumbbell flyes or pec-deck 1 x 6-10

Incline barbell or machine press 1 x 6-10

Dips 1 x 6-10 (If you can do more then 10 add weight)

Dumbbell, cable, or machine lateral raise 1 x 6-10

Barbell, dumbbell, or machine shoulder press 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell, cable, or machine rear delt 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell, or cable, overhead triceps extensions 1 x 6-10

Cable or machine triceps push-downs 1 x 6-10

Cardio: Machine of your choice for max distance or calories in 12 minutes

Cool-Down: 3 minutes

Stretch: 5-10 minutes full body

Workout 3.  Pulling (two days after workout 2.)

5 minute warm-up on treadmill, bike, or rower

Pull-ups or assisted pull-ups 1 x 6-10 (if you can do more then 10 pull-ups, add weight)

Close grip (V-bar) pull-downs 1 x 6-10

Reverse back fly with cable, dumbbells, or machine 1 x 6-10

Bent over rows with a dumbbell or barbell 1 x 6-10

Standing shrugs with dumbbells, barbells, or machine 1 x 6-10

Mid-section: Hanging knee raise or incline knee raise, low back extension, band or pulley rotations. 1 x 8-15

Cardio: Machine of your choice for max distance or calories in 12 minutes

Cool-Down: 3 minutes

Stretch: 5-10 minutes full body

Rest two days before starting over with workout number one.

Tips for continued success:

Intensity:

The repetition guidelines I have listed are just that, guidelines. Do not stop a set until you are un-able to perform another perfect rep. With exercises like Squats or Stiff-legged dead-lifts, stop 1-2 reps short of failure.

How much rest:

After you warm-up, move quickly from exercise to exercise. Strive to rest no more then 60 seconds between exercises.

How to be progressive:

First increase reps then increase weight. Once you can exceed 10 reps on your main exercises or 15 on core movements, add 5-10 lbs of weight.

How to add variety:

Exercises are essentially exchangeable. Exchange any major multi-joint, pushing, pulling or lower body movement with any other. Single joint movements such as arm curls and extensions as well as mid-section movements may be changed frequently as well. Just be sure to write down what you do and train as hard as possible on each work set.

Cardio:

Pick whatever machines you like or have available. Bike, Treadmill, Stair-climber, Rowing machine, they are all effective. For best results mix things up and use a different machine or mode each time. Just be sure to write down your distance or calories accurately.

Home training:

If you are doing this workout at home and have a well stocked home gym then follow the plan as closely as possible. If you are using resistance bands, sandbags, dumbbells, kettlebells, and or bodyweight movements then again create workouts that are as similar to those in the above plan as possible. Our exercise library database has more then enough ideas for you to choose from. For the cardio portion go to a track and see how far you can run around the track in 12 minutes (not including warm-up and cool-down). Choose a set time as before (say 12 minutes) and start running. In week one it may take you 12 minutes to run one mile. Don’t be surprised if by the end of six weeks you are going considerably further.

Have fun, work hard and don’t forget to drop us a line with your results.

PAU for NOW

TAKU
www.hybridfitness.tv
www.blackjackfitness.com

Workout in a hurry

6 weeks to a new you in the New Year (Part one)

The most common excuse that people give for not eating better and exercising regularly is a lack of time. In my articles “How to save time and money while still eating well” and “Simple steps to good nutrition” I have outlined strategies for eating, shopping and cooking more efficiently. In this article I will lay out a flexible six week plan that will totally re-shape your body with a minimal time spent working out. In fact when you look at the chart in part two you will see that you are only going to be working out 15 times in six weeks. Combine these quick and effective workouts with the healthy eating ideas from the articles mentioned above and you can not fail in your quest for a new you.

Before we begin I want you to do the following. First, if you have not already, read the two nutrition articles mentioned above. Then get your shopping list ready and plan out your eating for the next few weeks. Exercise combined with a healthy balanced personal eating plan is the one two punch that never fails to produce rapid and profound results in body recomposition. Second, I want you to weigh yourself as well as take measurements and pictures so that you can do an honest before and after comparison.* The photos should be taken with a plain back round and should show your entire body from head to toe. Wear a bathing suit or something else revealing so that you can truly see your bodies current shape and be able to compare it to your shape in six weeks. Take the photos from the front, side and rear. Stand relaxed with your hands at your sides. The measurements should be taken at the following anatomical land marks.

  1. Calves: Feet about 6 inches apart with weight on the foot not being measured.
  2. Thighs: Feet about 6 inches apart with weight on the foot not being measured.
  3. Buttocks: Stand straight with heels together and measure  around the widest part.
  4. Hips: Measure at a point just a bit higher then the buttocks.
  5. Waist: One inch above the belly button or around the widest part.
  6. Chest: At nipple line, lift arms, wrap tape, lower arms, measure.
  7. Shoulders: Tape around the widest part with arms hanging relaxed at sides.
  8. Upper arms: Arms straight out to sides, palms up, relaxed. measure thickest part.
  9. Forearms: Same position as above, measure thickest part.

 

Finally, if we want to know how much we have improved, we need to know where we are now. A few simple tests before we begin our six week workout plan will let us clearly see just how much progress we have made when we get to the end. The tests I recommend are as follows.

  1. Max push-up test: Do as many full push-ups as possible without stopping. Pause for one second at the top and bottom of each repetition.
  2. Max sit-ups test: See how many full sit-ups you can do in one minute. Lay on the floor with your feet flat and knees bent at 90 degrees. Cross your arms and place your hands on your opposite shoulders. Sit-up until your elbows touch your knees. Have a partner hold down your feet or anchor them under something.
  3. Max time for a static wall sit: Place your back flat against a wall with your knees bent at 90 degrees. See how long you can stay in this position. Time it with a stop watch.
  4. Max distance covered in 30 second run: Go to a football field with 100 yards marked on it. Start at one end and run as fast as you can comfortably run. See how many total yards you cover in 30 seconds. If you reach the end of the field before the time expires turn and run back the way you came.

In part two of this article I will detail the training plan for the entire six weeks including how to effectively combine strength training and cardio for maximum efficiency. Exercise variety options to avoid staleness in the gym. How to be progressive. How many sets and how much rest between sets. And more. See you there.

PAU for NOW

TAKU
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