Compound for Success

When training to enhance athletics, Compound movements should be your bread and butter. Training using almost exclusively compound movements saves time and guaranties maximum efficiency in your training. As a minimum standard be sure that you push and pull both vertically and horizontally and include some forms of squatting lunging and dead-lifting movements in your over all plan. Resisted and dynamic midsection work as well as neck and grip work are, an effective way to round out a well planned training program.

Here is a short list of movements you should include on a regular basis:

1. Horizontal press variations (Flat / Incline / Decline)

2. Horizontal Rows Variations (Overhand / Underhand / T-bar)

3. Vertical pulling variations (Chin-ups / Pull-ups / Pull-downs)

4. Vertical press variations (DB / BB / Military press / Press Behind neck)

5. Squat variations (Front / Back / Zercher)

6. Dead-lift variations (RDL / Stiff-legged / Standard)

7. Lunge variations (Forward / Lateral / Reverse)

8. Mid-section variations (Full contact twists / GHD / Knee raise)

9. Neck variations (Neck harness / Manual resistance / Neck-ups)

10. Grip variations (Farmers walks / Grippers / Timed Hangs)

PAU for NOW

TAKU

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Don’t Short Circuit Your Training

By Jim Bryan

One of the biggest problems I see is Over Thinking Things. Much of the time this leads to Analysis Paralysis. This  is where you spend more time thinking about doing something, than you actually spend doing it. How much does it matter about the speed of a rep? Does it matter more than actually going to the gym and  having a workout? How much does it matter what “Camp” your from? Is that more important then getting to the gym? About “Camps.” How important is it really to identify yourself as a “Volume Trainee,” a “Power Lifter,” an “Olympic Lifter,” A “HIT Trainee?”  Who are you training for? Yourself or the approval of someone else? Training isn’t really all that complicated. Some would have you think that it is, so they can sell you on Their Method. So much information and so little time. Might as well use that time by going to the gym.

When you go to most discussion boards you have the group looking for the One best way to train” and the one’s that just like to argue that Their way is the one true way.” Ever wonder if the same one’s that Know the One best Way” are just as confused as you? Many are and will argue for something else down the line. You also have the most Dogmatic types that will continue to argue long after their arguments are invalid. They are confused and need to be in the gym, instead of cruising the “Boards” so they can argue for their way, “The one best way.”

There is NO one best way! People have different goals. What works for you is what keeps you going to the gym and enjoying the trip there. Different ways of training have different levels of safety. Educate yourself, form an opinion and then follow through. The simplest way to Strength Train is to pick a group of exercises Starting with the legs and working to the upper body. Go up in weight when things get easy. Machines or Free Weights? What do you have? If you have both, try both. Try to be in and out within an hour.  Do you like “One set Training?” Then do it. Want to use “more than one set?” Then do that. Don’t fret and worry if someone is going to disapprove. It’s your workout! Go to the gym two or three days a week. You can add some cardio if you want. Cut down your rest periods and you may not need much cardio. Do it for yourself, because you want to.  Live long……..be strong!

TAKU’s Note:

Thanks to Jim Bryan for sharing another one of his excellent articles with us this week.

PRODUCT UPDATE:

In September I announced the arrival of a great new training tool from my friend coach Tom Kelso; a CD-ROM titled “100 of the best Strength Training Workouts”.

As I mentioned in my original announcement, the Data CD holds 40 x Total-Body, 30 x Upper-body and 30 x Lower-Body workouts that allow you to plug in any exercise based on your training facility.

Also included are an introductory text, workout catalog, workout descriptions, workout recording forms and a complete list of exercises are on file.

This is indeed an outstanding reference for the avid trainee, trainer or sport coach.

Well now Tom has made it even easier for you to get your hands on this great information. Visit his web-site, and you can purchase the CD, “100 of the best Strength Training Workouts”, as a download. No need to wait.

I highly recommend this training tool for trainers, athletes, coaches, and strength training enthusiasts of all levels.

Get yours now!

PAU for NOW

TAKU

Simple 20 Minute Conditioning

This week features another brief, intense and challenging workout which Combines running with body weight exercises.

For this workout you will only need your body-weight as the resistance. If you choose to train outdoors, I recommend that you go to a park or a high-school athletic field, and use running as the active segment between specific exercises. If you train indoors you may choose any of the suggested machines or any other activity that seems to fit the bill.

Attempt to complete the entire workout with minimal rest between each exercise or run. The goal time for completion is 20 minutes.
2:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Push-ups x max reps
1:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Bicycle Crunches x max reps
2:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Body Weight Squats x max reps
1:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Push-ups x max reps
2:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Bicycle Crunches x max reps
1:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
Body Weight Squats x max reps
2:00 hard run / bike / elliptical / rower other
This workout was created by my friend Coach Tom Kelso.
PAU for NOW
www.hybridfitness.tv
www.blackjackfitness.com

Workout in a hurry

6 weeks to a new you in the New Year (Part two)

In part one of this article I told you that we could re-shape your body in as little as 15 workouts over just six weeks. Having read part one you should have taken all of your photos and measurements as well as outlined your eating for the first few weeks of the plan. You should also know how many push-ups and sit-ups you can do as well as your time for a wall sit and how far you can run in 30 seconds. In part two I am going to outline the nuts and bolts of the plan as well as answer some basic questions and give options for those who may have limited access to workout equipment or who want to do their training bare-bones, boot-camp style; outside or at home.

We don’t have a lot of time. That is why we are using this plan in the first place. Let me reassure you it is not about the quantity but the quality of effort that is put forth that makes this type of training so efficient and effective. The workouts themselves are going to be brief and infrequent and therefore should be done with the utmost intensity. Don’t be intimidated by that word. Even if you are a beginner or coming back from a lay off you can work out hard enough to get great results. The secret is to try as hard as you can at the moment. As you recover and adapt each week, you will find that you are able to step it up a little more.

The workout will be done as follows. Each training day you will focus on a certain body region along with your cardio and stretching. None of these workouts should ever take longer then an hour including the warm-up, stretching and cool-down. In fact 45 – 50 minutes will probably be all you need as your fitness improves over the next few weeks. When I make recommendations for how many sets you should perform you will notice that I say one set. In my experience one good set is all you need to have success. Some people just can not seem to handle this approach and feel they need more. If you choose to do more keep this in mind. For each set you add you are using up more of your bodies recovery ability as well as increasing the total time you spend working out. The whole reason we are doing this workout is because we are in a hurry; so trust me and just do one set as hard as you can.

For the cardio portion of your training plan, your job is also to work as hard as you can in the moment. Whatever machine you choose to use I want you to go as far as possible in 15 minutes. I find that 15 minutes is all you need if you are really working as hard as you can. The cardio session is broken down as follows: You wont need to warm-up because you just finished your strength training session. So, pick a machine and work as hard and fast as you can for 12 minutes and then cool-down for about 3 minutes.

Do not increase the length of time you do cardio, just do your best to cover more distance then you did last time. How will you know how far you went? Look at the machine. Most of these machines will give you a distance read out. If not then use calories as your guide. If you burn more calories during the same length of time that means you are working harder then before.

Each time you train, be sure to write down everything you do in the gym. Write down how much you lifted in each exercise and when you can do more then 10 reps in any exercise, add some weight. Write down the distance you covered or the number of calories burned in your cardio session and strive to go further or burn more next time. Every little increase is significant. Be sure to keep the time you do your cardio consistent so that the calorie and distance numbers are accurate from session to session. Remember you are only working really hard for about 12 minutes.

The Workouts:

Workout 1. Lower body:

5 minute warm-up treadmill, bike, or rower

Squats 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell Lateral Lunges 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell Lunges to the rear 1 x 6-10 (each leg)

Straight leg dead-lifts 1 x 6-10

Single leg calf raise 1 x 6-10 (each leg)

Mid-section: Hanging knee raise or incline knee raise, low back extension, band or pulley rotations. 1 x 8-15

Cardio: Machine of your choice for max distance or calories in 12 minutes

Cool-Down: 3 minutes

Stretch: 5-10 minutes full body

Workout 2. Pushing (two days after workout 1.)

5 minute warm-up on treadmill, bike, or rower

Flat Dumbbell flyes or pec-deck 1 x 6-10

Incline barbell or machine press 1 x 6-10

Dips 1 x 6-10 (If you can do more then 10 add weight)

Dumbbell, cable, or machine lateral raise 1 x 6-10

Barbell, dumbbell, or machine shoulder press 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell, cable, or machine rear delt 1 x 6-10

Dumbbell, or cable, overhead triceps extensions 1 x 6-10

Cable or machine triceps push-downs 1 x 6-10

Cardio: Machine of your choice for max distance or calories in 12 minutes

Cool-Down: 3 minutes

Stretch: 5-10 minutes full body

Workout 3.  Pulling (two days after workout 2.)

5 minute warm-up on treadmill, bike, or rower

Pull-ups or assisted pull-ups 1 x 6-10 (if you can do more then 10 pull-ups, add weight)

Close grip (V-bar) pull-downs 1 x 6-10

Reverse back fly with cable, dumbbells, or machine 1 x 6-10

Bent over rows with a dumbbell or barbell 1 x 6-10

Standing shrugs with dumbbells, barbells, or machine 1 x 6-10

Mid-section: Hanging knee raise or incline knee raise, low back extension, band or pulley rotations. 1 x 8-15

Cardio: Machine of your choice for max distance or calories in 12 minutes

Cool-Down: 3 minutes

Stretch: 5-10 minutes full body

Rest two days before starting over with workout number one.

Tips for continued success:

Intensity:

The repetition guidelines I have listed are just that, guidelines. Do not stop a set until you are un-able to perform another perfect rep. With exercises like Squats or Stiff-legged dead-lifts, stop 1-2 reps short of failure.

How much rest:

After you warm-up, move quickly from exercise to exercise. Strive to rest no more then 60 seconds between exercises.

How to be progressive:

First increase reps then increase weight. Once you can exceed 10 reps on your main exercises or 15 on core movements, add 5-10 lbs of weight.

How to add variety:

Exercises are essentially exchangeable. Exchange any major multi-joint, pushing, pulling or lower body movement with any other. Single joint movements such as arm curls and extensions as well as mid-section movements may be changed frequently as well. Just be sure to write down what you do and train as hard as possible on each work set.

Cardio:

Pick whatever machines you like or have available. Bike, Treadmill, Stair-climber, Rowing machine, they are all effective. For best results mix things up and use a different machine or mode each time. Just be sure to write down your distance or calories accurately.

Home training:

If you are doing this workout at home and have a well stocked home gym then follow the plan as closely as possible. If you are using resistance bands, sandbags, dumbbells, kettlebells, and or bodyweight movements then again create workouts that are as similar to those in the above plan as possible. Our exercise library database has more then enough ideas for you to choose from. For the cardio portion go to a track and see how far you can run around the track in 12 minutes (not including warm-up and cool-down). Choose a set time as before (say 12 minutes) and start running. In week one it may take you 12 minutes to run one mile. Don’t be surprised if by the end of six weeks you are going considerably further.

Have fun, work hard and don’t forget to drop us a line with your results.

PAU for NOW

TAKU
www.hybridfitness.tv
www.blackjackfitness.com

CLASSIC H.I.T. WORKOUT

Following up from the awesome articles from Dr. Ken, John Wood, and Jim Bryan, I offer a straight-forward, no nonsense workout. No magic, no gadgets, just hard work on a handful of basic exercises. You should be able to get this workout done in under thirty minutes. If you are following the instructions below, this should see you breathing like a freight-train and totally spent by the time you make it through.

To begin the workout, skip rope, row  or do other light, total-body movements for 5 minutes followed by an easy, dynamic stretching routine. Then complete a set of neck* exercises . Then an abdominal / Core** routine. Once you have a sweat going, you are warmed-up and can begin the resistance training.

You will notice that the repetition ranges have 2 numbers. If an athlete reaches momentary muscular fatigue before he reaches the lower number on the rep-range the weight is too heavy. Likewise if he reaches momentary muscular fatigue beyond the higher number then it is time for him to increase the load.

Train with high intensity, push yourself to the point of momentary muscular failure and use just 1 set. I am a big believer in the 1 set protocol and am confident that one set is all that is required for success.

Strength train on Mondays and Thursdays, and do agility / conditioning work on Tuesdays and Fridays.

 

  1. Leg Press or Squat 15-20
  2. Leg Extensions 8-12 Seated or standing
  3. Leg Curls 8-12 Seated or standing
  4. Calf Raise 8-12 Seated or standing
  5. Chest press 8-12 Dumbbell, machine, or straight bar.
  6. Push-up
  7. Back Row 8-12 Dumbbell, machine, or straight bar.
  8. Shoulder Press 8-12 Dumbbell, machine, or straight bar.
  9. Chin-ups / Reverse Grip Pull downs 8-12
  10. Dead Lift 12-15 Dumbbell, machine, Hex or straight bar.
  11. Dips / Triceps Extensions 8-12 Dumbbell, machine, or straight bar.
  12. Bicep Curls 6-10 Dumbbell, machine, or straight bar.

If you are not used to training all out (and I meet very few who are) than I would ease into it by adjusting the rest intervals between sets as follows:

Week 1 – 2 = 2 minutes rest between sets
Week 3 – 4 = 1.5 minutes rest between sets
Week 5 – 6 = 1 minutes rest between sets
Week 7 and beyond, attempt to move between exercise with as little rest as possible. Pause only long enough to move from exercise to exercise or to change weight etc.

* Neck series = One set each of four-way neck exercise + any shrug movement. Resistance for the neck may be applied with a neck harness using Bands, or cables and or manual resistance etc.

** AB / Core series = One set each of Hip-curl / Low Back Ext / Resisted Rotation

For ideas for Conditioning work, search through our archives.

PAU for NOW

TAKU
www.hybridfitness.tv
www.blackjackfitness.com

Train those triceps

Hey everyone, I hope the holiday season is treating you well and you are not over-eating and under-training.

This week we have a link to some videos from my good friend Steve McKinney. For those of you who don’t know who Steve is (becuase you are  not on our mailing list) he is a personal trainer and owner of Fitness and More Inc. in Madison, Ill.

In this video series (click on the link below) Steve demonstrates exercises for both home and gym, men and women, that help strengthen and firm the triceps (the back of your upper arms).

http://tinyurl.com/ye6sxur

Enjoy the pain.

Pau for Now

TAKU

www.hybridfitness.tv
www.blackjackfitness.com