COMBAT CROSS-TRAINING SCHEDULE

Hey everyone, sorry I am a bit late with my up-date. As most of you probably know, I do my best to add something new every week. Well…I had a Birthday recently and was a bit distracted (more on that in the near future).

So this week I put together some quick little combat cross-training circuits. Try these on a non-strength day or depending on your goals, you could start or finish a workout with one of these little gems. Finally if your goal is to increase overall stamina as quickly as possible, try to stick with the weekly schedule as outlined below.

Your goal is to increase your speed on each part of the circuit while striving to lower the total time it takes you to complete the entire series each day. As you decrease rest between the elements of the series you will find your stamina improving rapidly. It is not unusual for people to notice improvements in as little as two weeks.

Now…GET TO IT!

P.S. if you do not have any of the suggested equipment on hand, replace it with something else. Be creative.

MONDAY:

1 Mile run (A.F.A.P.)*

3 x 2-minute rounds of Jump Rope

3 x 2-minute Rounds of Bag work

4 Sets of 25 bodyweight Squats


TUESDAY:
4 x 60-Yard Sprints
(A.F.A.P. 1:3 work to rest ratio)

10 x 30 sec on 30 sec off rowing

5 sets of 15 sec on 90 sec off speed training (Sprint A.F.A.P. for 15 sec)

10 minutes ARC trainer Strength


WEDNESDAY:
1 Mile run
(A.F.A.P.)*

3 x 2-minute rounds of Jump Rope

3 x 2-minute Rounds of Bag work

4 Sets of 25 bodyweight Squats


THURSDAY:
4 x 60-Yard Sprints
(A.F.A.P. 1:3 work to rest ratio)

5 minutes Speed intervals on Step-Mill

5 sets of 15 sec on 90 sec off speed training (Sprint A.F.A.P. for 15 sec)

10 minutes Intervals on Recumbent Bike


FRIDAY:
4 x 60-Yard Sprints (A.F.A.P. 1:3 work to rest ratio)

10 minutes ARC trainer Strength

3 x 2-minute rounds of Bag work

5 sets of 15 sec on 90 sec off speed training (Sprint A.F.A.P. for 15 sec)

*A.F.A.P. = As Fast As Possible

PAU for NOW

TAKU
www.hybridfitness.tv

www.blackjackfitness.com

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Six Weeks to Soccer Fitness

Like most of the planet, I am spending my time glued to the T.V. with a bad case of World Cup fever*. It is hard to believe it will all be over in another week.

With any sport that requires running, playing and practicing hard will help take you a long way to being ready for action on game day. However I am still a firm believer that one should get in shape to play their sport, not play their sport to get in shape. The better conditioned you are, the easier it will be for you to focus on the tactics and techniques of your sport.

With this in mind, I will lay out a supplemental six week plan to get fit for soccer (or any other open field sport).

Sample Program

Week #1:

• Repetition Distances – 440 yards

• Reps – 6

• Relief:work ratio – 2:1

• Work time – prescribed 440 work times are calculated in the following manner: The athlete’s one mile run time needs to be determined first, then that number is divided by 4 (to provide an average of the four laps – or each 440 – run). Four seconds then are subtracted from this quotient.

Example for an athlete who runs a 6 minute mile:

6 minutes divided by 4 = 90 seconds minus 4 seconds = 86 seconds. This athlete’s prescribed time for each 440 is 86 seconds or less.

• Total distance – 1.5 miles

Week #2:

• Increase the reps to 8 – everything else remains the same as week one.

• Total distance – 2 miles

 Week #3:

• Repetition distances – 440’s and 220’s

• Reps – 6 x 440’s, 4 x 220’s

• Relief:work ratios – 2:1 for the 440s, 3:1 for the 220s

• Work times – Remain the same for the 440s. For the 220s, you must first time the athletes in a ‘running start’ 220 (give them a five-yard running head start), then add 5 seconds to that time. Example: If an athlete’s time in a running start 220 is 25 seconds, his assigned time for the interval 220’s is 30 seconds.

• Rest between the 440 and 220 sets = 3-4 minutes

• Total distance – 2 miles

 Week #4:

• Repetition distances – 440’s, 220’s and 110’s

• Reps – 4 x 440’s, 4 x 220’s, and 4 x 110’s

• Relief:work ratios – 2:1 for the 440’s, 3:1 for the 220’s and 110’s

• Work time – Same for the 440’s and 220’s. Use the same ‘running start’ procedure for the 110’s and add 3 seconds for an assigned interval time.

• Rest between 440, 220, and 110 sets = 3 minutes

• Total distance – 1.5 miles

 Week #5:

• Repetition distances – 440’s, 220’s, 110’s

• Reps – 2 x 440’s, 6 x 220’s, 6 x 110’s

• Relief:work ratios – Same as week # 4

• Work time — Same as week # 4

• Rest between sets – Same as week # 4

• Total distance – 2,860 yards

 Week #6:

• Repetition distances 220’s, 110’s, and 50’s

• Reps – 6 x 220’s, 8 x 110’s, and 8 x 50’s

• Relief:work ratios – 3:1 for all runs

• Work time – Same for 220’s and 110’s. Using the same ‘running start’ procedure, add 1.5 to the result for the 50-yard interval assigned time.

• Rest between sets – 3 minutes between the 220’s and 110’s, 2 minutes between the 110’s and 50’s.

• Total distance – 2, 600 yards

 I recommend that you train four days per week with two strength days and two conditioning days. Your training week should look something like this:

Days 1 & 4 = Conditioning.
Days 2 & 5 = Strength.
Days 3-6 & 7 are rest days.

When training tactics and or technique, the ideal arrangement would be to perform the strength and conditioning sessions afterwords.

Now, get to it!

PAU for NOW

TAKU
www.hybridfitness.tv
www.blackjackfitness.com

*Congratulations to Germany for crushing Argentina 4 – 0

Combining Strength Training and other activities

Question: What is the optimal way to combine strength training with training for other specific sports, to achieve the best results?

Answer: Under ideal conditions sport specific training sessions such as sprinting or MMA would take place in the morning and strength training would occur in the afternoon. There should be approximately a four hour break between the morning skill session and the afternoon strength session. Follow each training day with a full day’s rest.*

An example would be to wake after a good nights sleep at 7:00 – 8:00 am. Eat breakfast. Take care of business. Perform your sport specific training between 10:00 and 12:00. Eat a light lunch at 12:30 pm and strength train around 4:00 – 5:00 pm. The following day would be a rest and recovery day which may consist of light activities such as, working on strategy, tactics or polishing sport specific mechanics. Stretching is also recommended.

This type of every other day schedule produces excellent results across broad populations by allowing intense training combined with a great deal of recovery. Most people however, due to the inconvenience of training twice in one day, would rather practice or play their sport on one day and strength train and condition on the next. Some will try to do both activities in the same day but without adequate rest between sessions. Neither of these methods has proved to be superior with regards to results, when compared to the first method discussed above.

*As noted in the example session above, active recovery on rest days is a good idea as long as intensity is kept very low.

PAU for NOW

TAKU

www.hybridfitness.tv
www.blackjackfitness.com

Episode #1 from IHRSA (X-Force Strength Equipment)

Taku and I attended the IHRSA convention in San Francisco last week and saw some really great equipment.  One of the first stops we made was to the X-Force Strength Equipment booth.  This video will show and describe how the equipment works.

Suffice it to say we had a blast and this video is just scratching the surface of the cool stuff to come.  We’ll be posting a new video every day so keep checking back.   If you have specific questions, please post them to the comments section below.  We’ll answer them right away.

Thanks and keep training hard!

Jason
www.hybridfitness.tv

UPDATE! www.hybridfitness.tv has launched!

It’s been a long time coming, but Hybridfitness.tv is finally live.  If you haven’t already, please visit the site and see what’s available.  We’ve put together hundreds of articles, audio clips and video presentations.  We’ve also added a few other cool custom features.  If you’re not on our mailing list, please sign into the box on the top/right of the page.  We’ll send out free training info and programs and keep you informed of new things we’re working on.  It’s 100% spam free – don’t worry.

One of these features can be found on the right-side navigation bar and it’s titled “Exercise Video Database”.  This database contains nearly 500 videos which can be selected by exercises type, equipment type or zone of the body.  You can select individual videos and see how a particular exercise is performed, then click for a detailed description of each exercise.

Additionally, you can create custom video playlists for yourself or others.  Begin by selecting your desired videos, then arrange them in the order you want.  You can add notes for repetition count, set count, time, etc., then export the playlist to a weblink or embed it directly in your own blog.  We’re adding more videos to the library all the time and of course, we’ll be posting our own custom workouts on an ongoing basis.  Trust me, you don’t want to miss out on this.

We’ve also got a new blog site established to take the place of this one.  It’s still free, just new and improved.  Please visit the new location at www.hybridfitness.tv/blog

Thanks for your continued support.

Keep training hard.

Jason
www.hybridfitness.tv

Time Progression Interval Training

I am adding this plan as a continuation of my GPP series for soccer players. (See the Blog post immediately following this one) Ultimately this workout could be used by any open field sport player such as Lacrosse, Rugby, Field Hockey, etc. who wishes to improve his/her GPP for their sport. (GPP: General Physical Preparedness) Finally this plan may also be used by anyone interested in getting in great running shape using a short sprint format.

This program lasts one month and is broken in to four, week-long phases. During each week you will sprint on three, non-consecutive days such as Monday-Wednesday-Friday. The only equipment required is a 100 yard athletic field, a stop watch and some good shoes to run in. I usually use an all weather artificial turf field to assure a smooth, even running surface. If you do not have access to such a field, make sure the field you choose is free of gopher holes, rocks and ruts as well as any other garbage or debris. We do not want any twisted or broken ankles or worse.

Begin with a pre-test to ascertain your current best time on a 100-yard sprint with a running start. From this number we will then create our time progression interval goal times. We will do this by adding 4-6 seconds to the best 100-yard time. As an example, if the best 100-yard time is 12 seconds, the time for repetitions of the 100-yard sprint during week one of the time progression interval sessions would be 12 + 4-6 = 16-18 seconds.

Below you will find an example of this training plan based on the pre-test running times listed above. The idea is to start each phase by running sub-maximal efforts and build over the four weeks to doing repeats of your best time. Take 7-10 days off after each four week block before starting a new cycle.

During the first week and there after, It will be easiest to complete this plan if you have a friend or training partner help keep you on pace by shouting out times as you run. Another way to do this is by having the partner blow a whistle at ¼ intervals of the goal time as you run.

EXAMPLE:

PHASE 1: For the first week strive to run 5-15 sprints at the 18 second pace, deciding when you can handle more. Athletes should rest 60-90 seconds between sprints (more if you have to). Be sure to warm-up and cool-down for 3-5 minutes before and after each session. Repeat this workout two more times that week.

5X 100 in 18 seconds with 60-90 seconds rest. Walk 2-4 minutes.
5X 100 in 18 seconds with 60-90 seconds rest. Walk 2-4 minutes.
5X 100 in 18 seconds with 60-90 seconds recovery.

PHASE 2:During week two strive for more consistency in your application of both work and rest. Repeat the workout below on three non-consecutive days such as Monday – Wednesday – Friday. Be sure to warm-up and cool-down for 3-5 minutes before and after each session.

5X 100 in 17 seconds with 60 seconds rest. Walk 2-4 minutes.
5X 100 in 16 seconds with 60 seconds rest. Walk 2-4 minutes.
5X 100 in 15 seconds with 60 seconds recovery.

PHASE 3: During week three repeat the workout below on three non-consecutive days such as Monday – Wednesday – Friday. Be sure to warm-up and cool-down for 3-5 minutes before and after each session.

5X 100 in 15 seconds with 55 seconds rest. Walk 2-4 minutes.
5X 100 in 14 seconds with 55 seconds rest. Walk 2-4 minutes.
5X 100 in 13 seconds with 50 seconds recovery

PHASE 4: During week four repeat the workout below on three non-consecutive days such as Monday – Wednesday – Friday. Be sure to warm-up and cool-down for 3-5 minutes before and after each session.

5X 100 in 13 seconds with 50 seconds rest. Walk 2-4 minutes.
5X 100 in 12 seconds with 45 seconds rest. Walk 2-4 minutes.
5X 100 in 12 seconds with 40 seconds recovery

Well there you have it a simple yet challenging way of gaining fitness using nothing but a 100-yard sports field. Keep in mind that similar programs could be easily developed for longer distances such as 200 – 400 – 800 meter sprints. For the longer distance programs a running track would be more suitable.

PAU for NOW

TAKU
www.hybridfitness.tv

Bodyweight Conditioning for Sport

The following is an excellent GPP, body-weight circuit for soccer players. Although soccer was the catalyst for creating the circuit, it’s an excellent program for all-around athletic conditioning in general. Just because you may not play soccer doesn’t mean this protocol won’t apply. Give it a shot.

The circuit is comprised of six different exercises done in order with the goal being to finish three total circuits as fast as possible. The six exercises are as follows:

1. ) Half Squat jumps: Athlete crouches until the knees are at 90 degrees and then drives up off the ground as high as possible, landing in an athletic jump stance. Repeat.

2.) Push-ups: I will not bother explaining this one as it is such a classic.

3.) Prone trunk extension: Lying prone With hands out in front (like Superman or clasped behind the head, lift shoulders and chest off of the ground as far as possible, Lower slowly, repeat.

4.) Squat Thrusts: From a standing position the athlete squats down and places their hands flat on the ground. They then thrust their feet back into a push-up position, jump back to a crouch, and then stand erect. Repeat.

5.) Sit-ups: Any sit-up variation will do here. I like elbows to knees. Lay on the ground with the knees up at 90 degrees. Place the palms of the hands on the forehead. Bring the elbows towards the knees without bringing the knees to the elbows. Repeat.

6.) Ten-Yard Shuttle Run: The athlete sprints between two markers set ten yards apart, bending to touch the marker at each end as they turn.

To help make the training a little more specific to each individual’s
fitness level, I recommend the following steps:

1.) Begin with a pre-test to ascertain the correct amount of work to be done during each circuit.

2.) Once the pre-test has been completed the athletes should attempt to complete three circuits three times a week for three weeks

3.) After three weeks the athletes should take 3-5 days off and then re-test to establish new work loads.

The test itself is quite simple. See how many repetitions of each exercise can be completed in sixty *seconds. Then each athlete should do 50% of that number in each exercise of each of the three circuits. For example, Athlete A completed 30 pushups in 60 seconds. For the next workout athlete A would then do 15 push-ups in each of the three circuits for a total of 45 push-ups in that workout. This is a great workout for younger players as well as anyone looking to build a solid fitness base for the game of soccer. As athletes progress in their fitness ability other tools may be added to make this workout more challenging such as Med-Balls, Resistance bands, weighted vests, sandbags etc.

Well I hope you enjoy this little circuit workout. Have fun and train hard.

PAU for NOW

TAKU
www.hybridfitness.tv

*Although this circuit is designed do be done as quickly as possible, each athlete should be coached to perform the movements with perfect form. If the form breaks down too much injury could occur. We want movement that we can control at all times, even when fatigued.