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Hey there…thanks for stopping by. Due to some family obligations I am temporarily not adding any new content. There are literally hundreds of articles to choose from in my archives, going all the way back to 2008. Please take a moment to look around, I am sure you will find stuff worth exploring.  I’ll be back soon with new content for you to enjoy.

PAU for NOW

TAKU

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W.O.W #6 “Santa Cruz”

By Wayne “Scrapper” Fischer

Don’t be misled by the subtle appearance of this workout. It’s very tough, and has the ability to challenge you on multiple levels.

Progress through each exercise with no rest.

Take a :60 rest after each round.

Record your total number of rounds completed and the overall completion time.

Push yourself on the next run-through and see if you can improve your time. Be aware of individual areas where you can shave seconds off your workout. Transitions between exercises and times on the Concept 2 & Versa Climber machines are 2 of the most obvious.

Good luck and train hard!

Santa Cruz
EXERCISE REP COUNT
VersaClimber OR Concept 2 Rower : VC: 250ft. C2: 500m
Overhead Lunges (KB or DB) : x30
Wall Ball Toss : x20
Hanging Knee Raises : x15


Perform 3 to 5 rounds for time

Note: “KB” and “DB” refer to Kettlebells and Dumbbells, respectively

TAKU’s NOTE: This is one of many Workouts of the Week that we create at Hybrid Fitness. If you are feeling hammered when your done, be sure to let Scrapper know.

© 2006-2009 HybridFitness.tv. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction without permission prohibited.

Compound for Success

When training to enhance athletics, Compound movements should be your bread and butter. Training using almost exclusively compound movements saves time and guaranties maximum efficiency in your training. As a minimum standard be sure that you push and pull both vertically and horizontally and include some forms of squatting lunging and dead-lifting movements in your over all plan. Resisted and dynamic midsection work as well as neck and grip work are, an effective way to round out a well planned training program.

Here is a short list of movements you should include on a regular basis:

1. Horizontal press variations (Flat / Incline / Decline)

2. Horizontal Rows Variations (Overhand / Underhand / T-bar)

3. Vertical pulling variations (Chin-ups / Pull-ups / Pull-downs)

4. Vertical press variations (DB / BB / Military press / Press Behind neck)

5. Squat variations (Front / Back / Zercher)

6. Dead-lift variations (RDL / Stiff-legged / Standard)

7. Lunge variations (Forward / Lateral / Reverse)

8. Mid-section variations (Full contact twists / GHD / Knee raise)

9. Neck variations (Neck harness / Manual resistance / Neck-ups)

10. Grip variations (Farmers walks / Grippers / Timed Hangs)

PAU for NOW

TAKU

Conditioning – Just shut up and do it!

By Jason Klofstad 

Total Body Circuit #1

Warm Up:

Jump Rope — 2 minutes

Circuit:

Dumbbell Thruster————–60 seconds

Renegade Row (dumbbell)—–60 seconds

T-Stance Pushup—————-60 seconds

Mountain Climbers————–60 seconds

Sit-Throughs———————60 seconds

Dumbbell Swings—————-60 seconds (30 sec. L / 30 sec. R)

Burpies (Squat-thrust w/pushup and jump)-60 seconds

Rest:

1 minute of rest between circuits. Work to complete 3 total circuits for a total of 21 minutes of work, excluding the warm-up.

Notes:

• You should be completely taxed after each 60 second round. Select weights accordingly. By example, you should be struggling for the last few repetitions on the thrusters, etc. as you approach the 60 second mark.

• Transition immediately from one exercise to the next. For example, after the dumbbell thrusters, place them on the floor and immediately begin the renegade rows. After the rows, release the dumbbells, stay in position and go right into the T-stance pushup. Have whatever you need for each exercise already set up to use.

• This circuit is 7 exercises at 1 minute each for a total of 7 continuous minutes of physical exertion per circuit. The idea is to develop your strength and conditioning simultaneously. Therefore, do everything you can to continue working for the entire time on each exercise. Pace yourself. Slow down if you must, but DO NOT STOP working!

• If 20lb. dumbbells are suitable for thrusters but too light for rows, have multiple dumbbells available.

• Adjust your progression accordingly. If you’re not able to do 3 full circuits, work up to it. If you’re able to complete 3 circuits, increase the intensity of each exercise and circuit by:

a) increasing speed (performing more reps per 60 sec. interval)

b) increasing weight

c) decreasing the rest time

• Add dumbbells to the burpies to increase the intensity.

• Feel free to add a weighted vest to give more resistance throughout the circuit.

Now get to it!

The Viking has spoken.

Time Flies

By Jim Bryan

I still remember when I started weight training. I was about 12 years old and had trained for a couple of years on a small weight set my Dad got me. Then I was involved in a serious Motor Cycle accident and was out of training for a while. That was when I was 14. The Dr. told me If I hadn’t been lifting I’d probably be pushing up daisy’s.

I got back into training as soon as I could and have been at it ever since.
I also remember the severe diets when I was doing Bodybuilding Contests. Don’t miss them at all. This was before Dr. Atkins. Funny thing is we were doing the Low Carb thing long before it got popular. It happens that way in Strength Training. Much of what is considered “New and Cutting edge” is actually old and recycled. We trained to failure back then without making a fuss over it. We also used free weights AND machines and never thought about the latest “Functional Training” smokescreen.

A little story about “Functional Training.” It seems the KING (That’s what he’s called) of “Functional Training” was doing a seminar and was going to demonstrate how to develop balance by jumping onto a “Swiss Ball.” He did and busted his ass…….right in front of everyone! I don’t know if anybody got their money back but this type of BS goes on all the time. Thank goodness in my day we were limited to basic training ideas and didn’t have to deal with as much BS as trainees today.

I also remember the Supplement Craze in my day, that has continued up till now. The idea that you can’t gain without supplements is still big business. Now you have Pro Hormones that companies are hawking that may only have bad side effects and none good. In my day There was the Body Building Camp and the Strength Camp. I did both and am happy I did. But Body Building back then wasn’t near as freaky as it is now. I don’t believe for a second that today’s top BB’s are healthy. AND they haven’t been “clean” in years.

Things have gotten much simpler for me now. I still try to train hard and often. I still try new things. I still read. But I don’t worry about all the small things. I have some strength left but I find it’s hard to stay lean as I want to. I just eat less most of the time. I don’t go to Internet Discussion boards much anymore for the simple reason that I’ve heard most of it…..several times. I don’t worry about TUL or TUT. I’m not looking for the latest get big drink. I filter BS pretty good but now and then I find some good Info or Friends to discuss it with. I don’t give a c**p about “what’s best Free Weights or Machines?” They both work. I also don’t care if “Failure Training” works for the masses. I know it worked for me and everyone else that I have seen. I don’t see anything wrong if you do or don’t want to train to failure. It’s your business. Why are you training? Is it for you or someone else? If it isn’t for you, you’ll fail. I also think you can enjoy training, most people won’t continue something they don’t enjoy. I also believe Safety should be an issue for your training. Without it you may be limping around someday.

Mahalo Nui Loa!

TAKU’s NOTE:
This article was originally written by Jim Bryan  on 03-28-04. I want to thank  Jim for sharing another one of his excellent, straightforward, no-nonsense articles with me.

One and Done

Five Easy Steps to a One Hour Workout

Two of the biggest mistakes I see in the gym are people training too often, and not training hard enough. Most folks mistakenly believe that they can make up for lower quality workouts, by simply upping the quantity. Unfortunately this does not work.

Most of these people hit the gym five or six days a week, repeating the same old stuff over and over, like a hamster going round and round on his little wheel. The sad thing is they make about as much forward progress as that hamster does…they are basically going no where.

On the other end of the spectrum are the folks who feel they just don’t have time to train. They want to do cardio, lift weights, stretch, and still have a life. They look at the gym hamsters, and wish that they to could somehow find the time to spend 10-12 hours a week in the gym.

WAKE UP PEOPLE!!!

First, you will not make progress by doing the same thing over and over. If you expect your body to produce a change, than you must start by inducing that change with an unaccustomed stimulus.

Next,once the stimulus has been introduced, get out of the gym and let your body do it’s thing. The workout does not produce the change. Change happens during your recovery period.

Finally, 5-6 workouts every two weeks is enough to get the job done. Not only that, each workout should not take more than an hour to complete. That’s right, one hour. You will do cardio, weights, stretching…and all in one hour.

Here’s how it works:

Step One. 0-5 minutes. Warm-up = Easy cycling @ 60% Max Heart Rate

Step Two. 5-20 minutes. Endurance exercise (Cardio) = Interval cycling alternating 3-min @ 70% Max Heart Rate and 3-min @ 80% Max Heart Rate

Step Three. 20-25 minutes. Cool-down = Easy cycling @ 60% Max Heart Rate

Step Four. 25-55 minutes. Strength Training = One set each of 8-12 exercises covering all major muscle groups. Example: Leg Press, Leg Curl, Chest Press, Row, Shoulder Press, Pull-down, Triceps, Biceps, Ab’s, Low-back

Step Five. 55-60 minutes. Cool-down and Stretching = the Big-4: Hamstring stretch, Low-back Stretch, Shoulder Stretch, Calf Stretch

WOW…That was easy. Now, get into the gym and create your own workout using the above guidelines as your template. If you like free-weights, use free-weights. If you prefer running or rowing to cycling, DO IT!.  Try alternating three days in the gym the first week, and only two days the next. Mix things up, keep it fresh.

Before you know it, you’ll be having fun, getting fit, and still have time for a life outside the gym.

PAU for NOW

TAKU

I want it All

I keep hearing that song by Queen in the back of my head. The one with the chorus that says “I want it all, I want it all, I want it all and I want it now”. Many of my clients are very busy people and do not have tons of time to devote to exercise outside of the time they choose to spend with me.

Most personal trainers focus on strength training with their clients. They have come to think of “cardio” as some long duration, low intensity activity that the clients should be doing, but on their own time. They make recommendations like “do 30-60 minutes of cardio 3-5 times a week”. I actually know a trainer that tells his clients that in order to be successful they need to do four, 90-minute strength sessions a week, plus another 3-5 hours of cardio on their own time. Talk about inefficient.

This workout is one I use to make sure that my clients can get everything they need in our time together. This plan combines heavy weightlifting with interval style “cardio” training, alternating between the two. Depending on the current needs and abilities of the client there may be from 3-5 exposures to each. The strength training is done in three set mini circuits where in you choose a pushing movement a pulling movement and a lower body movement. The interval training is conducted in four minute blocks using mixed modalities in which the work to rest ratios are varied during each exposure. Rest between the strength and interval bouts is the time it takes to walk from one area of the gym to another. During the strength movements you may vary the rest from 30 – 90 seconds depending on how heavy you wish to train and how challenged you wish to be.

If you are an athlete looking for a great GPP plan for any sport or activity give this style of mixed mode training a try. If you are a trainer who usually just does strength training with your clients, surprise them with this brief and brutal workout. I guarantee you or your clients will see and feel a difference in performance in no time.

Remember the circuits below are just a few examples of 100s you can create. Use these as a template and see what kind of workouts you can come up with. You are limited only by your imagination and the tools you have access to.

Example of Mixed-Mode Hybrid:

 

Strength Circuit 1. 1 x 6-10 reps each

  • Chin-up or weighted Chin-up
  • Dip or weighted Dip
  • Single leg Squat off a box Bodyweight or weighted

H.I.I.T. Mode 1. Four minutes

 

  • Concept 2 – (20 sec work / 10 sec recovery)

Strength Circuit 2. 1 x 6-10 reps each

  • Dumbbell Row
  • Dumbbell Bench
  • Dumbbell CDL+S

H.I.I.T. Mode 2. Four minutes

  • L.B.E. (exercise bike) 30 sec work / 30 sec recovery

Strength Circuit 3. 1 x 6-10 reps each

  • Dumbbell Alternating High pull
  • Dumbbell Alternating Shoulder press
  • Dumbbell reverse lunge

H.I.I.T. Mode 3. Four minutes

  • Stair Sprints 20 sec work / 20 sec recovery

Strength Circuit 4. 1 x 6-10 reps each

  • Hanging Knee raise (weighted if more then 10 reps can be completed)
  • GHD raise (weighted if more then 10 reps can be completed)
  • Cable rotations

PAU for NOW

TAKU